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Outcomes

Positive aspects of caregiving: rounding out the caregiver experience

Objectives: To identify positive aspects of caregiving and examine how they are associated with caregiver outcomes.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Cognitive-behavioural therapy and motivational intervention for schizophrenia and substance misuse: 18-month outcomes of a randomised controlled trial

BACKGROUND: Comorbid substance misuse in people with schizophrenia is associated with poor clinical and social outcomes.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Illustrating the importance of including the views and experiences of users and carers in evaluating the effectiveness of drug treatments for dementia

Undertaking a literature review revealed that when evaluating the effectiveness of the drug treatments for dementia few studies purposefully explore the views of users and carers. Their views are mainly derived from secondary analysis of conventional scientific evidence. Where the views of users and carers were explored it was discovered that they evaluate the effectiveness of the drug treatments in terms of quality of life.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Personalised caregiver support: effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in subgroups of caregivers of people with dementia

Objective: Insight into the characteristics of caregivers for whom psychosocial interventions are effective is important for care practice. Until now no systematic reviews were conducted into the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for caregiver subgroups.

Methods: To gain insight into this relationship between caregiver subgroups and intervention outcomes, a first review study was done. This study reviews the personal characteristics of caregivers of people with dementia for whom psychosocial interventions were effective.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Perceived barriers and facilitators to positive therapeutic change for people with intellectual disabilities: client, carer and clinical psychologist perspectives

Studies have highlighted successful outcomes of psychological therapies for people with intellectual disabilities. However, processes underlying these outcomes are uncertain. Thematic analysis was used to explore the perceptions of three clinical psychologists, six clients and six carers of barriers and facilitators to therapeutic change for people with intellectual disabilities.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

In partnership with carers

Describes the process and outcomes of developing a carers' training and education programme, for carers of people with dementia, using a partnership approach.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

User and carer involvement in mental health services: from rhetoric to science

User or carer involvement is often seen as intrinsically worth while; but if such involvement is a good thing in itself, it would not matter whether changes resulted from it. However, most people argue for user or carer involvement because they think some useful change will follow as a consequence. Being involved can benefit users or carers both personally (for example, by empowering them or increasing their social contacts) and practically (for example, by enabling them to earn money or learn new skills).

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

When a little knowledge is a dangerous thing: a study of carers' knowledge about dementia, preferred coping style and psychological distress

The aim of this study was to improve understanding of the relationship between carers' existing knowledge about dementia, their coping style and psychological morbidity. Fifty carers and patients attending day services were recruited. Carers were given questionnaires to assess knowledge of dementia, preferred coping style, anxiety, depression and strain. The results indicated that carers who demonstrated more knowledge about the biomedical aspects of dementia were more anxious.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Predicting mental health outcomes in female working carers: a longitudinal analysis

This study investigated the factors contributing to psychological distress and positive affect over time in female working carers of older people. Questionnaires (including measures of work-related, care-related, interpersonal and psychological aspects of working and caring) were distributed to 275 female working carers in the UK, the majority of whom were working as nurses in the National Health Service. In cross-sectional analyses, higher work stress and work demands predicted higher psychological distress among respondents.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09