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Palliative care

Understanding the palliative care needs and experiences of people with mesothelioma and their family carers: An integrative systematic review

Background: People with mesothelioma and their families have palliative care needs throughout the relatively short trajectory of their illness. Aim: To describe the palliative care needs and experiences of people with mesothelioma and their family carers. Design: Integrative systematic review with narrative synthesis (PROSPERO: CRD42020190115). Data sources: MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Library were searched for articles published between 01 January 2000 and 10 May 2020.

Fri, 07/22/2022 - 10:28

Treatment Decision Making and Regret in Parents of Children With Incurable Cancer

Background: The treatment-related decision-making process is a highly emotional time for parents of children with incurable cancer, and they tend to continue the cancer-directed treatment even when they realize that there is no cure for their child. Objective: To evaluate whether parents involved in different treatment decisions regretted their treatment decision after their child's death. Methods: We collected prospective data from 418 parents of children who died of incurable cancer after receiving cancer care at 1 of 4 hospitals.

Fri, 07/15/2022 - 20:19

Translation, cultural adaptation and validation of the Chinese version of the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool for family caregivers of cancer patients receiving home-based hospice care

Background: Family caregivers need to be supported in caring for patients at the end of life, but practical tools to assess their support needs have been missing in China. So this study aimed to culturally adapt and validate the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT). Methods: Cross-cultural adaptation of the original CSNAT for a Chinese setting was performed according to Brislin’s translation guidelines. A pilot study was conducted with 15 Chinese family caregivers of cancer patients receiving hospice home care and 5 medical staff.

Fri, 07/08/2022 - 18:54

Transitions during end-of-life care from the perspective of informal caregivers – A concept analysis using Rodgers' (2000) evolutionary approach

Background: To produce a conceptual and operational definition of transition, in the context of end-of-life care, as experienced by informal caregivers. Methods: The authors used Rodgers' (2000) concept analysis framework to examine this concept. Findings: Common themes emerged using Rodgers' (2000) inductive approach confirming transition for informal caregivers at the end of life as a process comprising the presence of trigger(s)/event(s), awareness, instability and engagement/learning while maintaining normality.

Fri, 07/08/2022 - 18:18

Telehealth in Palliative Care: Communication strategies from the COVID-19 pandemic

Background: Palliative care was once believed to be too high-touch to be delivered via telehealth. However, numerous studies have demonstrated the positive effects of palliative care delivered through telehealth. Because the COVID-19 pandemic has quickly shifted how health care is delivered to patients with cancer, particularly because of their immunocompromised status and the risks associated with unnecessary exposures in the clinic, previous lessons from palliative care research studies can be used to inform practice.

Wed, 06/29/2022 - 14:01

Supportive care needs and service use during palliative care in family caregivers of patients with advanced cancer: a prospective longitudinal study

Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the supportive care needs of family caregivers (FCs) of advanced cancer patients and their support service use at the beginning of specialist inpatient palliative care (SIPC), near the patient's death, and during bereavement. Methods: FCs reported their needs using the Family Inventory of Needs (FIN), along with their utilization of psychosocial and bereavement support services at the beginning (N = 232) and 6–9 months after SIPC (N = 160).

Tue, 06/28/2022 - 21:20

Smiles behind the masks: A systematic review and narrative synthesis exploring how family members of seriously ill or dying patients are supported during infectious disease outbreaks

Background: Infection control measures during infectious disease outbreaks can have significant impacts on seriously ill and dying patients, their family, the patient-family connection, coping, grief and bereavement. Aim: To explore how family members of patients who are seriously ill or who die during infectious disease outbreaks are supported and cared for during serious illness, before and after patient death and the factors that influence family presence around the time of death. Design: Systematic review and narrative synthesis.

Wed, 06/22/2022 - 10:34

A qualitative study of bereaved family caregivers: feeling of security, facilitators and barriers for rural home care and death for persons with advanced cancer

Background: For cancer patients and their family, an important factor that determines the choice to die at home is the caregivers' feeling of security when caring for the patient at home. Support to caregivers from healthcare professionals is important for the feeling of security. In rural areas, long distances and variable infrastructure may influence on access to healthcare services.

Mon, 06/13/2022 - 18:57

Psychometric Testing of the Spanish Modified Version of the Mini-Suffering State Examination

Background: The mini-suffering state examination is a valid and reliable measure that have been used to assess suffering in patients with advanced cancer. The aim of this study was to carry out a psychometric analysis of the Spanish version of the mini-suffering state examination. Method: A validation study was conducted. Seventy-two informal caregivers of deceased patients in palliative care were included in this study.

Mon, 06/13/2022 - 12:01

Patients and family caregivers report high treatment expectations during palliative chemotherapy: a longitudinal prospective study

Background: When discussing treatment options and future care, it is important to understand the expectations of patients and family caregivers related to palliative chemotherapy and to identify patterns in patients’ quality of life. The study aims were to evaluate differences in treatment expectations and quality of life between patients with thoracic cancer (non-small-cell lung cancer, small-cell lung cancer and mesothelioma) who were < 70 and ≥ 70 years of age and receiving palliative chemotherapy and to assess family caregivers’ treatment expectations.

Sat, 06/11/2022 - 10:06

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