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Partners in care: sharing

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

My wife, Pauline, died from Alzheimer’s disease at the age of 59. She was 51 when diagnosed after several years of problems. I cared for her at home. For the first 3 years, I maintained my employment, albeit on an increasingly part-time basis, but resigned from work and cared for her full-time for 5 years when her needs demanded round-the-clock attention. She remained in her own home to within 5 weeks of her death, when fracturing my leg put paid to my direct caring role.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

Parents and partners: lay carers' perceptions of their role in the treatment and care of adults with cystic fibrosis

Background.  Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common autosomal recessive genetic disease in Caucasian people, traditionally conceptualized as a condition whereby sufferers died in childhood. However, the current median survival age of 30 and a predicted median survival age of 40 for those born with the disease over the last decade ensure that families members will assist hospital staff with treatment and care well into most patients' adulthood.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

In sickness and in health: experience of caring for a spouse with MS

Background People are not expected to die from multiple sclerosis although, as the condition progresses over a period of time, some people become increasingly disabled and will require assistance with all activities of daily living. Their partners invariably carry out these tasks. Objective To gain a deeper understanding of the experiences of the partner living with and caring for a spouse disabled by multiple sclerosis.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Quality of life : impact of chronic illness on the partner

Patient quality of life is an increasingly important outcome measure in medicine and healthcare. It is now widely used in clinical trials and in patient management for assessing morbidity and the impact of treatment. In the past, quality of life studies focused almost exclusively on changes in the quality of life of patients, but increasing attention is now being paid to the impact of chronic disease on carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Does caring for your spouse harm one's health? Evidence from a United States nationally-representative sample of older adults

The purpose of this article is to investigate the relationship between spousal care-giving and declines in functioning and self-rated health among older care-givers. The authors used data from the 2000 and 2002 waves of the United States Health and Retirement Study, a biennial longitudinal survey of a nationally representative cohort of adults aged 50 or more years. Two outcomes were examined, declines in functioning and declines in self-rated health.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

A dimensional analysis of caregiver burden among spouses and adult children

Purpose of the study: Caregiver burden is a multidimensional construct, addressing tension and anxiety (stress burden), changes in dyadic relationships (relationship burden), and time infringements (objective burden) resulting from caregiving.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

Change of identity: the psychological and emotional impact of caring for someone with multiple sclerosis

The diagnosis of a chronic progressive condition such as multiple sclerosis (MS) can impact on many aspects of daily life. Living with, and caring for, an individual with such a condition is likely to have emotional and psychological consequences. We carried out semi‐structured interviews with nine partners and analysed the interview transcripts using grounded theory (Strauss & Corbin, 1998), the phase presented in this article formed part of a larger overall study that explored the impact of living with MS for partners and a family.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

Capturing the Huntington's disease spousal carer experience: a preliminary investigation using the ‘Photovoice’ method

The purpose of this exploratory study was to capture and describe the experiences of family carers of Huntington's disease (HD) patients, specifically in relation to their Quality of Life (QoL). Visual representations of QoL were gathered using ‘Photovoice’. Five spousal carers photographed and described elements of their life in which they felt their QoL was being enhanced or compromised. Using content analysis, nine manifest themes were identified and tentative latent inferences were made in relation to these themes.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Partner care at the end-of-life: identity, language and characteristics

The delivery of services and benefits to people supporting older and disabled relatives and friends depends largely on their identification within constructs of ‘care-giving’ and ‘carer’. Those who are married or living with a partner may be particularly resistant to adopting the identity of ‘care-giver’ or ‘care receiver’. This paper investigates the circumstances of couples and their adoption of carer identities, drawing on a study of the financial implications of a partner's death.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Relying on informal care in the new century? Informal care for elderly people in England to 2031

The research reported here is concerned with the future of informal care over the next thirty years and the effect of changes in informal care on demand for formal services. The research draws on a PSSRU computer simulation model which has produced projections to 2031 for long-term care for England. The latest Government Actuary's Department (GAD) 1996-based marital status projections are used here. These projections yield unexpected results in that they indicate that more elderly people are likely to receive informal care than previously projected.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12