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Cohort study of informal carers of first-time stroke survivors: profile of health and social changes in the first year of caregiving

Informal carers underpin community care policies. An initial cohort of 105 informal live-in carers of new stroke patients from the South Coast of England was followed up before discharge, six weeks after discharge and 15 months after stroke with face-to-face interviews assessing physical and psychological health, and social wellbeing. The carer cohort was compared to a cohort of 50 matched non-carers over the same time period. Carer distress was common (37–54%), started early on in the care-giving experience and continued until 15 months after stroke.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:20

Going home to get on with life: Patients and carers experiences of being discharged from hospital following a stroke

Purpose. In this paper we aim to develop the understanding of what constitutes a ‘good’ or ‘poor’ experience in relation to the transition from hospital to home following a stroke.

Method. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 20 people and 13 carers within one month of being discharged from hospital following a stroke. Interviews covered views of mobility recovery and support from therapy and services. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, coded and analysed in depth in order to explore the discharge process.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Informal caregivers' participation when older adults in Norway are discharged from the hospital

This paper describes the participation of informal caregivers in the discharge process when patients aged 80 and over who were admitted from home to different hospitals in Norway were discharged to long-term community care. Data for this cross-sectional survey were collected through telephone interviews with a consecutive sample of 262 caregivers recruited between October 2007 and May 2009.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

'Out of Hospital': a scoping study of services for carers of people being discharged from hospital

Successive government policies have highlighted the need to inform and involve carers fully in the hospital discharge process. However, some research suggests that many carers feel insufficiently involved and unsupported in this process.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

Multicenter randomized controlled trial of an outreach nursing support program for recently discharged stroke patients

Background and Purpose— Many stroke patients and informal carers experience a decreased quality of life after discharge home and are dissatisfied with the care received. We assessed the effectiveness of an outreach nursing care program.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Costs and caregiver consequences of early supported discharge for stroke patients

Background and Purpose— Early supported discharge (ESD) for stroke has been shown to yield outcomes similar to or better than those of conventional care, but there is less information on the impact on costs and on the caregiver. The purpose of this study is to estimate the costs associated with an ESD program compared with those of usual care.

Methods— We conducted a randomized controlled trial of stroke patients who required rehabilitation services and who had a caregiver at home.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Effect of carer education on functional abilities of patients with stroke

Background/Aim: Stroke is a well-documented public health problem in low, middle, and high-income countries. Post stroke, patients are discharged home quite early and usually need help with activities of daily living. This help is usually provided by informal carers. The purpose of this study was to establish the effect of carer education on functional abilities of patients with stroke in a low resource setting where access to rehabilitation post discharge was limited.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Hospital at home: a resurgence

Swaleh Toofany examines the evolution and possible future options for hospital at home schemes

Healthcare providers are under pressure to deliver cost-effective care to a population that is ageing. Increased longevity means the number of patients with long-term conditions and chronic illness is growing. Expanding the range of services delivered to patients in their homes may provide a solution by keeping patients out of hospital.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

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