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Patient preference

Important components for Dutch in-home care based on qualitative interviews with persons with dementia and informal caregivers

Background Dementia care in the Netherlands is increasingly dependent on informal care and has the aim to keep persons with dementia at home for as long as possible. However, little is known about the preferences and needs of people with dementia living at home. Including people with dementia and their informal caregivers in research and policy creation could help to identify necessary forms of support, and tailor care to their personal preferences and needs.

Mon, 04/05/2021 - 15:25

Impact on place of death in cancer patients: a causal exploration in southern Switzerland

Background: Most terminally ill cancer patients prefer to die at home, but a majority die in institutional settings. Research questions about this discrepancy have not been fully answered. This study applies artificial intelligence and machine learning techniques to explore the complex network of factors and the cause-effect relationships affecting the place of death, with the ultimate aim of developing policies favouring home-based end-of-life care.

Mon, 04/05/2021 - 15:16

Patient and caregiver experience with delayed discharge from a hospital setting: A scoping review

Background: Delayed hospital discharge occurs when patients are medically cleared but remain hospitalized because a suitable care setting is not available. Delayed discharge typically results in reduced levels of treatment, placing patients at risk of functional decline, falls and hospital‐related adverse events. Caregivers often take on an active role in hospital to mitigate these risks. Objective: This scoping review aimed to summarize the literature on patient and caregiver experiences with delayed hospital discharge.

Mon, 01/27/2020 - 12:30

How do people with dementia and family carers value dementia-specific quality of life states? An explorative “Think Aloud” study

Objective: To investigate the decision-making processes applied by people with dementia and family carers participating in using health economic approaches to value dementia-specific quality of life states. Methods: People with dementia (n = 13) and family carers (n = 14) participated in valuing quality of life states using two health economic approaches: Discrete Choice Experiment (DCE) and Best Worst Scaling (BWS). Participants were encouraged to explain their reasoning using a “Think Aloud” approach.

Tue, 10/22/2019 - 14:36

'It all depends!': A qualitative study of preferences for place of care and place of death in terminally ill patients and their family caregivers

Background: It is often suggested that terminally ill patients favour end-of-life care at home. Yet, it is unclear how these preferences are formed, if the process is similar for patients and family caregivers, and if there are discrepancies between preferences for place of care and place of death.

Thu, 06/13/2019 - 12:19

Shared decision-making and providing information among newly diagnosed patients with hematological malignancies and their informal caregivers: Not "one-size-fits-all"

Objective: To optimize personalized medicine for patients with hematological malignancies (HM), we find that knowledge on patient preferences with regard to information provision and shared decision-making (SDM) is of the utmost importance.

Tue, 01/22/2019 - 13:24

Preference for a single or shared room in a UK inpatient hospice: patient, family and staff perspectives

Objective This study investigated the preferences of patients, family and staff for single or shared rooms in a UK hospice.

Method Semistructured interviews were conducted with patients, informal carers and staff at a hospice, focusing on room type preference.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11