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Pilot projects

The needs of informal carers: a proposed assessment tool for use by public health nurses

AIM: To develop an assessment tool for the collection of information on carers' needs and to pilot test same. BACKGROUND: No formal assessment of the needs of carers is undertaken by Public Health Nurses (PHNs) in the West of Ireland. METHOD: An assessment tool which took the form of a questionnaire was designed based on an earlier needs analysis, a literature review and qualitative data obtained with carers at two focus groups. Sixty carers were involved in the pilot study of the tool.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

New approaches to supporting carers' health and well-being: evidence from the national carers' strategy demonstrator sites programme: report summary

The National Carers’ Strategy Demonstrator Sites (DS) programme was developed by the Department of Health (DH) as part of the commitments made in the 2008 National Carers’ Strategy (HMG, 2008). The DS programme, delivered across England, comprised 25 partnerships. With a delivery period of 18 months, each site was expected to develop new, innovative services for carers, or to extend existing provision if effective arrangements were already in place.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Burden of informal carers in northwest Ireland: A pilot study of factors that influence burden

Introduction Research has shown that approximately 67% of carers experience extreme mental tiredness, a decrease in their quality of life and a deterioration in their physical health since taking on a care-giving role. Aims and objectives This study aims to identify factors that influence carer burden and in doing so, identify the sub-populations of carers who are most susceptible to burden. Methods In northwest Ireland, 53 informal carers referred to the Carers Association, Sligo were contacted and met for a face-to-face interview.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Finding the service you need: human centered design of a Digital Interactive Social Chart in DEMentia care (DEM-DISC)

Community dwelling people with dementia and their informal carers experience a lot of problems. In the course of the disease process people with dementia become more dependent on others and professional help is often necessary. Many informal carers and people with dementia experience unmet needs with regard to information on the disease and on the available care and welfare offer, therefore they tend not to utilize the broad spectrum of available care and welfare services.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Dementia and ethics: the views of informal carers

There has been little work on the ethical issues facing non-professionals who care for relatives or others with dementia. A qualitative pilot study was conducted in ten such individuals, eight of them women, caring for persons drawn mainly from one general practice. The interviews indicated that many of the dilemmas faced by carers are ethical and that the issues differ from those faced by professionals. Ethical issues are sometimes the most troublesome matter for carers. Unlike issues for professionals, they arise from a personal context and are shaped by long-term relationships.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Experiencing dementia: evaluation of Into Dementia

Background: Most persons with dementia in the Netherlands live at home, where they are cared for by informal carers such as family members or friends, who offer this care unpaid. Their care-task poses a high burden on these informal carers, increasing the risk of health problems and social isolation. Many informal carers indicate they want more information on the behaviour of those they care for.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Dying at home: evaluation of a hospice rapid-response service

Various studies suggest that there is a preference among patients, professionals and the public for death to occur at home (Dunlop et al, 1989; Townsend et al, 1990; Hinton, 1994). Data indicates that some patients are denied the opportunity to exercise choice in the place of death. In areas where palliative rapid-response teams have been available more people have been able to die at home. This article presents the findings of an evaluation of a hospice rapid-response service in the Highlands of Scotland, which was designed to respond to the needs of people in crisis facing death.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

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