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Propensity score matching

Is the grass greener on the other side? The health impact of providing informal care in the UK and the Netherlands

Background: Facing rapidly ageing populations, many Western countries aim to stimulate informal care provision as a way to meet the growing long-term care (LTC) demand. While various studies report the impact of providing informal care on the health of caregivers, it is less clear whether and to what extent this impact differs across countries.

Mon, 06/06/2022 - 22:54

Informal caregiving and mortality―Who is protected and who is not? A prospective cohort study from Japan

Informal caregiving is linked to psychological stress. However, recent studies have suggested a protective association between informal caregiving and mortality among caregivers. We sought to test the association between caregiving and survival in the Komo-Ise study, a prospective cohort of community-dwelling residents aged 44–77 years living in two areas in Gunma prefecture, Japan. Caregiving status was assessed in 2000, and 8084 individuals were followed for ten years. All-cause mortality was ascertained from official registers.

Wed, 06/26/2019 - 12:10

Spillover effect of Japanese long-term care insurance as an employment promotion policy for family caregivers

We evaluate a spillover effect of the Japanese public long-term care insurance (LTCI) as a policy to stimulate family caregivers’ labor force participation. Using nationally representative data from 1995 to 2013, we apply difference-in-difference propensity score matching to investigate the spillover effect in two periods: before and after the introduction of the LTCI in 2000 and before and after its major amendment in 2006.

Mon, 03/11/2019 - 10:12

Investigating the causal relationship between employment and informal caregiving of the elderly

Objective: Examining the causal relationship between employment and informal caring to date has been impeded in countries like Ireland where there is a lack of suitable panel data and/or variables for instrument construction. This paper employs propensity score matching to control for non-random selection into treatment and control groups which controls for differences in employment outcomes between carers and non-carers in Ireland using data from Quarterly National Household Survey 2009 Quarter 3.

Tue, 02/19/2019 - 20:27