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Psychiatry

Partners in care: who cares for the carers?

Little time may be taken to listen to what carers have to say or explain clinical and service policies. The odd 5 minutes at the end of a busy clinic is not enough; being paraded in front of the ward round is simply unacceptable, but it still happens. A 20-mile trip for family carers just as imprisoned by the patient’s mental illness, geographically and financially, may be impossible.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

A study of family contact with clients and staff of community mental health teams

AIMS AND METHOD Despite good evidence for their effectiveness in the treatment of schizophrenia, family interventions are difficult to implement. Prior to a local trust-wide programme to encourage their use, we carried out a case note review of family contact with clients and staff of community mental health teams (CMHTs). A 10% sample of CMHT clients was included.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Do patients really want copies of their GP letters? A questionnaire survey of older adults and their carers

AIMS AND METHOD The National Health Service Plan stated that all correspondence between clinicians would be copied to patients by April 2004. We wanted to find out whether this practice reflected the true desires of their patients. A questionnaire survey was therefore performed in older adults and their carers attending a psychiatric out-patient clinic.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Developmental psychiatry - insights from learning disability

The Blake Marsh lecture, an annual lecture on learning disability, was endowed in 1963 in memory of Dr Blake Marsh, the former medical superintendent of Bromham House Colony in Bedford.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Care arrangements for people with dementia in developing countries

Background: Rapid demographic ageing will soon lead to large increases in the numbers of persons with dementia in developing countries. This study is the first comprehensive assessment of care arrangements for people with dementia in those regions.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Family carers' responses to behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia

Objectives: To describe the responses of family carers to the behavioural and psychological symptoms associated with dementia.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

User and carer involvement in mental health services: from rhetoric to science

User or carer involvement is often seen as intrinsically worth while; but if such involvement is a good thing in itself, it would not matter whether changes resulted from it. However, most people argue for user or carer involvement because they think some useful change will follow as a consequence. Being involved can benefit users or carers both personally (for example, by empowering them or increasing their social contacts) and practically (for example, by enabling them to earn money or learn new skills).

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

When a little knowledge is a dangerous thing: a study of carers' knowledge about dementia, preferred coping style and psychological distress

The aim of this study was to improve understanding of the relationship between carers' existing knowledge about dementia, their coping style and psychological morbidity. Fifty carers and patients attending day services were recruited. Carers were given questionnaires to assess knowledge of dementia, preferred coping style, anxiety, depression and strain. The results indicated that carers who demonstrated more knowledge about the biomedical aspects of dementia were more anxious.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Involving carers and service users in the training of psychiatrists

In June 2005 it became mandatory for psychiatric trainees to receive training directly from people who experience mental health problems and their carers. This will be checked on approval visits to all training schemes, and accreditation may be withheld until this aspect of training is in place.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Managing behavioural and psychological symptoms in dementia

Behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are common and problematic in clinical practice and represent a significant part of the day-to-day workload of the old age psychiatry team in hospital, institution and community settings. Improving recognition and management of BPSD can have a positive impact on the quality of life of patients and their carers and potentially delay the transition from home to institutional care.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

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