Skip to content

Toggle service links

You are here

  1. Home
  2. Quality of care

Quality of care

'Triadic' shared decision making in mental health: Experiences and expectations of service users, caregivers and clinicians in Germany

Background: Shared decision making (SDM) in mental health may contribute to greater patient satisfaction and is sometimes associated with better health outcomes. Here, SDM should not only involve service users and clinicians but also involve the service users' caregivers. Aim: This study aimed to achieve better insight into the current SDM patterns of triads of service users, caregivers and clinicians in inpatient mental health care and the three parties' expectations towards the prospects of triadic SDM.

Fri, 07/15/2022 - 20:38

The tension between carrying a burden and feeling like a burden: a qualitative study of informal caregivers’ and care recipients’ experiences after patient discharge from hospital

Purpose: The number of people aged 80 and above is projected to triple over the next 30 years. Expanding public expenditure on long-term care services has made policies encouraged informal caregiving. Burden of care describes challenges connected to informal caregiving. Dependent patients report feelings of being a burden. Few studies have focused on both the experience of caregiver burden and recipients’ feelings of burden. This study explore the experiences of old patients and informal caregivers in the first 30 days after the patient’s discharge.

Wed, 06/29/2022 - 17:37

#MoreThanAVisitor: Families as "Essential" Care Partners During COVID-19

The public health response to the current Coronavirus pandemic in long-term care communities, including assisted living, encompasses prohibiting visitors. This ban, which includes family members, has been criticized for being unfair, unhealthy, and unsafe. Against this backdrop, I examine the roles family play in residents' daily lives and care routines.

Wed, 06/08/2022 - 19:13

Bereaved Family More Likely to Report "Too Little" Care than "Too Much" Care at the End of Life

Background: An often-stated concern is that dying persons receive too much aggressive medical care. Objective: Examine next-of-kin perceptions of the amount of medical care received in the last month of life. Design: Mixed-methods study with 623 survey responses and in-depth interviews with a subsample of 17 respondents. Subjects: Nontraumatic deaths 18 years and older in San Francisco Bay area.

Fri, 01/14/2022 - 16:13

'Take more laxatives was their answer to everything': A qualitative exploration of the patient, carer and healthcare professional experience of constipation in specialist palliative care

Background: Constipation is a major problem for many older adults, more so for those who are receiving specialist palliative care. However, limited research reports the subjective experiences of constipation, despite evidenced differences between the healthcare professional and patient/carer perspective. Aim: The main aim of this study is to explore the experience of how constipation is assessed and managed within specialist palliative care from the patient, carer and healthcare professional perspective.

Thu, 01/14/2021 - 14:48

Quality of Care Perceived by Older Patients and Caregivers in Integrated Care Pathways With Interviewing Assistance From a Social Robot: Noninferiority Randomized Controlled Trial

Background: Society is facing a global shortage of 17 million health care workers, along with increasing health care demands from a growing number of older adults. Social robots are being considered as solutions to part of this problem.Objective: Our objective is to evaluate the quality of care perceived by patients and caregivers for an integrated care pathway in an outpatient clinic using a social robot for patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) interviews versus the currently used professional interviews.

Mon, 12/14/2020 - 10:07

Informal caregivers’ views on the quality of healthcare services provided to older patients aged 80 or more in the hospital and 30 days after discharge

BACKGROUND: In the European Union (EU), informal caregivers provide 60 per cent of all care. Informal caregiving ranges from assistance with daily activities and provision of direct care to helping care recipients to navigate within complex healthcare and social services systems. While recent caregiver surveys document the impact of informal caregivers, systematic reviews show that they have unmet needs. Because of the political desire to reduce the length of hospital stays, older patients are discharged from the hospital 'quicker and sicker' than before.

Fri, 12/11/2020 - 11:41

Caregiver involvement in psychiatric inpatient treatment - a representative survey among triads of patients, caregivers and hospital psychiatrists

Aims Studies on the frequency of caregiver involvement in representative inpatient samples are scarce. The aim of our study was to conduct a representative survey on caregiver involvement in routine inpatient care involving all three parties (patients, caregivers, psychiatrists). Therefore, we performed face-to-face interviews consisting of open-ended questions to gain a deeper understanding of when and how caregivers are involved in care treatment and to identify which topics are mainly discussed.

Tue, 08/04/2020 - 16:03

The care capacity goals of family carers and the role of technology in achieving them

Background: As global populations age, governments have come to rely heavily on family carers (FCs) to care for older adults and reduce the demands made of formal health and social care systems. Under increasing pressure, sustainability of FC's unpaid care work has become a pressing issue. Using qualitative data, this paper explores FCs' care-related work goals, and describes how those goals do, or do not, link to technology. Methods: We employed a sequential mixed-method approach using focus groups followed by an online survey about FCs' goals.

Thu, 07/30/2020 - 14:11

Regrets of family caregivers in Israel about the end of life of deceased relatives

Objective: We aimed to clarify the content of different types of regrets or lack of regret, and the frequency of feeling regret among family caregivers who assisted their relatives during their end of life stage. Method: Seventy primary informal caregivers in Israel were interviewed (17 spouses, 52 children, and 1 cousin) concerning their regret about the end of life of their deceased relative, including a general question about regret and questions about regret concerning life-sustaining treatments.

Wed, 02/26/2020 - 12:18

Page 1 of 3