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Dementia Caregiving Research: Expanding and Reframing the Lens of Diversity, Inclusivity, and Intersectionality

This forum expands and reframes the lens of dementia caregiving research among diverse racial and ethnic groups to better understand the unique needs, stressors, and strengths of multicultural and racial-ethnic family caregivers in the United States. By providing more diverse and inclusive knowledge on caregiving to older adults in the United States, we can create a new path forward with regards to caregiving research. Throughout the article, major questions and answers are supported by critiquing some of the caregiving literature.

Thu, 11/26/2020 - 11:33

Attitudes toward advance care planning among persons with dementia and their caregivers

Objectives: To examine factors that influence decision-making, preferences, and plans related to advance care planning (ACP) and end-of-life care among persons with dementia and their caregivers, and examine how these may differ by race. Design: Cross-sectional survey.Setting: 13 geographically dispersed Alzheimer's Disease Centers across the United States.Participants: 431 racially diverse caregivers of persons with dementia. Measurements: Survey on Care Planning for Individuals with Dementia.

Tue, 08/04/2020 - 12:05

Differences within Differences: Gender Inequalities in Caregiving Intensity Vary by Race and Ethnicity in Informal Caregivers

Among the 50+ million informal caregivers in the US, substantial gender, racial/ethnic, and socioeconomic disparities in caregiving intensity are well-documented. However, those disparities may be more nuanced: gender disparities in caregiving intensity may vary by race/ethnicity (White, Black, and Hispanic) and socioeconomic status (SES).

Wed, 01/22/2020 - 16:30

Well-being of Sibling Caregivers: Effects of Kinship Relationship and Race

Purpose of the Study: This study examined whether caregiving has a differential effect on the well-being of sibling caregivers relative to other caregiving groups and whether race moderates this effect. Design and Methods: Using the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States, 631 family caregivers (including 61 sibling caregivers) and 4,944 noncaregivers were identified.

Thu, 03/21/2019 - 15:35

Caregiver Burden, Care Recipient Depressive Symptomology, and Social Exchange: Does Race Matter?

Informal caregivers play a vital role in supporting seriously ill patients. However, informal caregiving is burdensome and can lead to negative health outcomes for the caregiver and the care recipient. The study's aim was to evaluate relationships among caregiver burden, care recipient depressive symptomology, and race. Guided by the social exchange perspective, we examined cross-sectional dyadic data from the National Long-Term Care Survey (N = 1279).

Thu, 01/31/2019 - 11:29

Informal Caregiver Stress

Research shows the stressful demands of caregiving to older family members can have negative effects on physical health. The effects on physical health may include: immune system functioning, heart rate reactivity, raised blood pressure levels, and increased risk of mortality among older spousal caregivers. Gender differences in caregivers' outcomes exist because, compared with male caregivers, female caregivers face higher levels of caregiving stressors, have fewer social resources, and report lower levels of psychological and physical health.

Thu, 08/23/2018 - 15:23