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Recognition

"Like He's a Kid": Relationality, Family Caregiving, and Alzheimer's Disease

Spousal caregivers draw upon understandings of shifting relationality to maintain a familial understanding of their spouse with Alzheimer's disease. Working through what it means to think of an adult with Alzheimer's disease "like a child," I trace how spouses negotiate their shifting relationships across the course of Alzheimer's.

Mon, 02/17/2020 - 13:50

Authenticity, ambivalence and recognition in caring at the end of life and beyond

Informal caring at the end of life is often a fraught experience that extends well beyond the death of the person receiving care. However, analyses of informal carers' experiences are frequently demarcated relative to death, for example in relation to anticipatory grief (pre-death) or grief in bereavement (post-death).

Mon, 09/30/2019 - 14:37

Struggles for recognition and redistribution: family carers and domestic workers in Spanish eldercare

Theories of social justice have identified the revaluation of caregiving work as a global challenge. Still, struggles for recognition are shaped by the specific cultural and institutional contexts in which they emerge. This article explores struggles for the recognition of caregiving work in Spanish eldercare, focusing on advocacy for family carers and for domestic workers.

Fri, 05/03/2019 - 17:01

‘It made me realise that I am lucky for what I got’: British young carers encountering the realities of their African peers

Despite a growing number of studies comparing the experiences of young carers in the global North and South, little has been done to explore young carers' representations of their global peers. In this paper we examine the reflections of British young carers after having visited an exhibition displaying photos and stories articulating the caregiving experiences of young carers in Zimbabwe and Kenya. We do this to explore the role of safe and transformative social spaces in facilitating positive identity constructions.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

Women's work is never done: Employment, family and activism - An introduction

This article frames the issues in the Supreme Court case, Nevada Department of Human Resources v. Hibbs, and introduces the articles making up the inaugural symposium of the Law and Women's Studies Program at the University of Cincinnati. Hibbs involved a husband who was trying to get leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) in order to take care of his severely injured wife. The case presents an opportunity to rethink issues of work and family, the legal subordination of women, and the law as an agent for social change, and it was therefore an ideal focus for the symposium.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17