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RELIGION

Spiritual needs and communicating about death in nonreligious theistic families in pediatric palliative care: A qualitative study

Background: Spiritual support should be offered to all patients and their families regardless of their affiliated status with an organized religion. Aim: To understand nonreligious theistic parents’ spirituality and to explore how parents discuss death with their terminally ill children in mainland China. Design: Qualitative study. Setting/participants: This study was conducted in the hematology oncology center at Beijing Children’s Hospital. Participants in this study included 16 bereaved parents.

Thu, 01/19/2023 - 17:41

Respite Care for Families of Children with Disabilities: A University/Faith Community Model

Families of children with disabilities or special healthcare needs report respite care as a great need, yet availability of such care is scarce. A partnership developed between a nursing school in the Southeast and a faith community, to provide respite care and summer camps, resulted in a win-win situation for families, children, interprofessional students and educators, the faith community, and volunteers. This article explains the need for respite, how schools of nursing and faith communities can partner, and the benefits to all stakeholders.

Thu, 01/05/2023 - 12:15

Spiritual and religious coping and depression among family caregivers of pediatric cancer patients in Latin America

Objective: Several studies have shown that spiritual/religious beliefs are associated with mental health and quality of life. However, so far, no study assessed the relationship between spiritual/religious coping (SRC) and depressive symptoms in family caregivers (FCs) of pediatric cancer patients, particularly in Latin America. This study aimed to investigate whether Positive and Negative SRC strategies are associated with depressive symptoms in FCs of pediatric cancer patients in Brazil. 

Tue, 12/20/2022 - 09:44

Life After an Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnosis: A Comparison of Stress and Coping Profiles of African American and Euro-American Caregivers

The purpose of the present study was to understand how caregiver stress and coping behaviors impact African American and Euro-American families differently when caring for a child with autism. This study used discriminate function analysis to contrast the stress and coping profiles of Euro-American caregivers who are more acculturated with the majority culture with African American caregivers who ascribe to more traditional values. A sample of 103 families was recruited (52 Euro-American, 51 African American).

Tue, 12/13/2022 - 15:41

The Association of Positive or Negative Religious Coping Methods With Psychological Distress and Quality of Life Among Parents of Infants With Congenital Heart Disease

Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether positive and negative religious coping methods were associated with psychological distress and quality of life in parents of infants with congenital heart disease (CHD). Methods: This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted at a provincial hospital in Fujian, China. Clinical data from 115 parents of infants with CHD were collected. Chinese Sociodemographic Forms, Brief RCOPE, Beck Depression Interview (BDI), and the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) were used in this study.

Wed, 08/31/2022 - 15:09

Caring for persons with drug use disorders in the Yangon Region, Myanmar: Socioeconomic and psychological burden, coping strategies and barriers to coping

Background: Drug use disorder (DUD) is a serious health condition that imposes a heavy burden on the persons who have a drug addiction experience and their families, especially in countries, such as Myanmar, where few formal support mechanisms are in place and repressive drug laws exacerbate the situation. Yet, in Myanmar, little is known about how informal caregivers are affected.

Tue, 08/23/2022 - 21:07

Overcoming Challenges to Surrogate Decision Making for Young Adults at the End of Life

Surrogate decision makers (SDMs) are challenged by difficult decisions at the end of life. This becomes more complex in young adult patients when parents are frequently the SDMs. This age group (18 to 39 years old) commonly lacks advanced directives to provide guidance which results in increased moral distress during end of life decisions. Multiple factors help guide medical decision making throughout a patient's disease course and at the end of life. These include personal patient factors and SDM factors.

Fri, 06/10/2022 - 10:44

Factors related to the use of religious coping by informal caregivers: an integrative review

Objectives: to identify the factors related to the use of religious coping in informal caregivers. Methods: integrative literature review carried out through a search in the databases LILACS, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and CINAHL, in addition to the Virtual Health Library and SciELO. The study selected primary articles in English, Portuguese, and Spanish, using the descriptors Coping Behavior, Caregivers, Spirituality, and Religion, which were combined with each other and with synonyms.

Sun, 05/15/2022 - 17:24

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