Skip to content

Toggle service links

You are here

  1. Home
  2. Reminiscence therapy

Reminiscence therapy

Effects of modified 8-week reminiscence therapy on the older spouse caregivers of stroke survivors in Chinese communities: A randomized controlled trial

Objective: Our aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of a modified 8‐week reminiscence therapy on the burden, positive experience, and life satisfaction of older spouse caregivers and the life satisfaction of stroke survivors. Methods: We conducted a randomized controlled trial by using 75 older stroke couples recruited from communities in Zhengzhou, China.

Wed, 04/03/2019 - 13:27

Non-pharmacological approaches for dementia that informal carers might try or access: a systematic review

Objective: To review non-drug treatments for dementia; to provide a source of evidence for informal carers who want ideas about non-drug approaches for dementia, that they might try or that they could try to access. The systematic review addresses: what non-drug treatments work and what do they work for? What non-drug treatments might work and what for? What non-drug treatments do not work?

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Application of the capability approach to health economics research involving informal carers of people with dementia

In the UK, the number of people with dementia is increasing along with life expectancy - over half of the £23bn annual cost of dementia is due to informal care time. Therefore, there is an economic argument for identifying clinically-effective and cost-effective ways to maintain and improve carer quality of life (QoL). This thesis explores the suitability of a capability based instrument, the ICECAP-O, for measuring QoL in informal carers of people with dementia. Methods: Systematic reviews, qualitative interviews, survey data and clinical trial data were used.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

The experience of family carers attending a joint reminiscence group with people with dementia: a thematic analysis

Reminiscence therapy has the potential to improve quality of life for people with dementia. In recent years reminiscence groups have extended to include family members, but carers’ experience of attending joint sessions is undocumented. This qualitative study explored the experience of 18 family carers attending ‘Remembering Yesterday Caring Today’ groups. Semi-structured interviews were transcribed and subjected to thematic analysis.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12