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The Business of Caring: Women's Self-Employment and the Marketization of Care

Our goal in this article is to contribute to a differentiated analysis of paid caring work by considering whether and how women's experiences of such work is shaped by their employment status (for example, self-employed versus employee) and the nature of care provided (direct or indirect). Self-employed care workers have not been widely studied compared with other types of care workers, such as employees providing domestic or childcare in private firms or private homes. Yet their experiences may be quite distinct.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Blue skies in the "Journal of Mental Health"? Consumers in research. Editorial

Describes a new strand in this journal in its coverage of research that involves mental health service users and is important to their concerns. Looks at some of the ways in which service user involvement can change research and heralds the dawn of a new era where service users and informal carers are not just the subjects of investigation, but can now have an effect on an influential research forum. (Quotes from original text)

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Making it clear and relevant: patients and carers add value to studies through research document reviews

Purpose – The National Institute of Health Research MHRN established the Feasibility and Support to Timely recruitment for Research (FAST-R) service in 2011, to provide rapid patient and carer feedback on research documents, prior to ethical review. The aims were to improve the feasibility of studies, to speed up regulatory processes and enhance study set up and completion. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether and how the FAST-R service benefits the review process.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Emotional and Tangible Reciprocity in Middle- and Older-Aged Carers of Adults With Intellectual Disabilities

Reciprocal benefits may exist in relationships between carers and their adult sons/daughters with intellectual disabilities, but the topic has not been widely studied. The present study investigated whether older carers of adult children with intellectual disabilities perceive emotional and tangible reciprocity in their relationships and the association between perceived reciprocity with quality of life. The authors surveyed 91 parental carers (aged 50+ years, mean = 60.8).

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

An Analysis of Responsibility, Attachment Security, and Relationship Efficacy among Young Carers

While there is a growing body of literature regarding young carers, there are a number of gaps in our knowledge about these young people. In this study we attempted to fill these gaps by asking: 1) Do young people who care for a parent feel greater or lesser attachment security and relationship efficacy than adolescents who do not care for a parent?, 2) Is there a difference between young people who care for a parent and those who care for another family member?

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

Transitions into informal caregiving and out of paid employment of women in their 50s

Data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health were used to study the order of events leading to informal caregiving and changes in labour force participation in mid-aged women, taking into account health and socioeconomic status. This analysis included 9857 women who responded to the third (2001) and fourth (2004) surveys and provided data for the caring and employment variables used. Caring was defined as providing care for an ill, frail or disabled person at least 7 h/wk. Between 2001 and 2004, the proportion of women caring increased from 12 to 14%.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

Knowledge generation about care-giving in the UK: a critical review of research paradigms

While discourse about care and caring is well developed in the UK, the nature of knowledge generation about care and the research paradigms that underpin it have been subjected to limited critical reflection and analysis. An overarching synthesis of evidence – intended to promote debate and facilitate new understandings – identifies two largely separate bodies of carer-related research.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Risk and adult social care: identification, management and new policies. What does UK research evidence tell us?

Risk is a central defining feature and area of concern in adult social care provision, but what do we actually know about how service users, carers and practitioners define and manage risk? This question is increasingly important as current policy advocates greater service user choice and control through a range of self-directed support mechanisms, and statutory duties and professional boundaries are challenged.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Sharing mental health information with carers: pointers to good practice for service providers

It is possible that effective information-sharing strategies to improve the quality of care can be developed. Service users, carers and professionals should all be involved in generating such strategies. The ideal information-sharing strategy can be tailored to individuals' needs and requires professionals to make carefully weighted judgements. Professionals need training to help them to understand the roles of carers and to work with carers effectively. Training should be accredited in order to encourage attendance.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Supporting ‘Young Carers’ in Kenya: From Policy Paralysis to Action

African children who care for sick or dying adults are receiving less than optimal support due to confusion about whether or not young caregiving constitutes a form of child labour and the tendency of the authorities to play it “safe” and side with more abolitionist approaches to children's work, avoiding engagement with support strategies that could be seen as support of child labour.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16