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Preparing for the future: people with learning disabilities and their ageing family carers

The update reports on an action research project which aimed to identify how best to support older family carers and their relatives with learning disabilities plan for a transition from living together in the family home. It found that there are eight distinct stages to this process. Moving on takes time and sensitivity on the part of services and workers. The process must develop at a pace and in a way that retains the confidence of the family carers. Firm plans are only realistic where a move is imminent. Where this is not the case preparation work is still vital. 3 refs. [Summary]

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Carers' experiences when the person for whom they have been caring enters a residential aged care facility permanently: a systematic review

BACKGROUND: Primary research, including qualitative research, as well as experts working in social services and aged care have identified the mixed feelings carers experience when the person they have been caring for is admitted into a residential aged care facility permanently. They have raised the importance of understanding these experiences as a means to implementing policies and programs that enhance carers' well-being.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

The economic and social cost of dementia in Ireland

The economic and social burden of dementia on society is the value of all the resources used to prevent, diagnose, treat, and generally cope with the illness. This article assess the overall resource implications of dementia in Ireland. Six main areas are covered in the cost analysis as follows: mortality and life years lost, in-patient acute care, in-patient psychiatric care, residential long-stay care, family care, and primary and social care in the community.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Why carers of people with dementia do not utilise out-of-home respite services

While many people with dementia require institutional care, having a co-resident carer improves the likelihood that people can live at home. Although caregiving can have positive aspects, carers still report a high need for respite. Despite this need, the use of respite services for carers of people with dementia is often low. This article investigates carer beliefs regarding out-of-home respite services and why some carers do not utilise them.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

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