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Respite care

The intersection of employment and care: evidence from a UK case study

Working carers are a key focus of UK policies on health and social care and employment. Complementing national and European evidence, this paper presents a local case study of working carers. It draws on data from a county-wide survey containing a module on caring. Data were primarily categorical and were analysed using SPSS. Three quarters of all carers who responded to the survey were of working age: two thirds were employed and one third had been employed previously. The majority of working carers were mid-life extra-resident women.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

A proper break: effective respite services for carers of people with dementia

Dementia is a diagnosed condition which is estimated to affect more than 750,000 people in the UK, and the numbers affected are increasing (AS, 2004). The majority of older people with dementia are cared for at home by a relative or friend. Caring for people with dementia is known to be physically and emotionally exhausting. Respite care aims to relieve carers of caring responsibilities in the short term, and offer a positive experience for the person being cared for.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

Assessing the applicability of GIS in a health and social care setting: planning services for informal carers in East Sussex, England

Informal carers save the state's health and social care services billions of pounds each year. The stresses associated with caring have given rise to a number of short-term care services to provide respite to carers. The Carers (Recognition & Services) Act of 1995 identified formally for the first time, the important role that unpaid carers provide across the community in Britain.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

Strategies for the relief of burden in advanced dementia care-giving

Aim.  This paper is a report of a study conducted to uncover the strategies that women caregivers of relatives with advanced dementia use to rest from care-giving.

Background.  Respite consists of activities and situations that briefly take caregivers away from their care-giving responsibilities. Qualitative studies are focusing on respite as an outcome and are deepening our knowledge about the experience of caregivers’ rest. The strategies that caregivers use to relieve the burden, however, are not fully known.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

Literature review: use of respite by carers of people with dementia

Respite care is a cornerstone service for the home management of people with dementia. It is used by carers to mitigate the stress related to the demands of caring by allowing time for them to rest and do things for themselves, thus maintaining the caring relationship at home and perhaps forestalling long-term placement in a residential aged care facility. Despite numerous anecdotal reports in support of respite care, its uptake by carers of people with dementia remains relatively low.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

The hospice caregiver support project: providing support to reduce caregiver stress

Introduction: The vast majority (80%) of care provided to hospice patients is given by informal and unpaid caregivers, who are often family members. They may be responsible for everything from management of the household and finances to medical and personal care. Providing this kind of care to a loved one at the end of life can contribute to increased stress, health problems, and decreased quality of life.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

How do we facilitate carers' involvement in decision making?

Background. Government health care policy urges service providers to involve service users in the decision-making process. Research studies have recommended changes to current health care practice to facilitate this involvement. However, carers’ organizations continue to highlight a gap between policy and practice in relation to involvement.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Breaking the mould: developing a new service for people with dementia and their carers

Respite care or ‘short breaks’ are currently heavily promoted as services to support older people and their carers. However, uptake of such services can be limited and there is a need to design models which are more flexible and responsive, and also reflect the ethos of personcentred care, which is currently one of the main drivers of health and social care policy in the UK. This paper describes the rationale for, and the philosophy behind, a new service for people with dementia and their carers recently established in Sheffield which provides respite care in the person's own home.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

The legitimacy of rest: conditions for the relief of burden in advanced dementia care-giving

This paper is a report of a study conducted to identify the conditions that favour the relief of the burden of female caregivers of relatives with advanced dementia. Respite services are a response to caregivers' needs for rest. Although they are wanted and needed services, caregivers do not always have access to or use them. The need for a caregiver-centred approach to relieving the burden of care is a conclusion which respite researchers are increasingly reaching. The method was, grounded theory was chosen as the research strategy.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Breaking point: a report on caring without a break for children and adults with severe or profound learning disabilities

Mencap’s 2003 Breaking Point report identified the appalling situation faced by the majority of families caring for children and adults with severe and profound learning disabilities. Despite highlighting the issues with central and local government at every opportunity, Mencap continues to meet families pushed to breaking point. We have revisited the issues in this report, as we have come across many more stories of families who are still not getting the short break they need. We can confirm that, sadly, nothing has really changed.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12