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self-rated health

Associations Between Informal Caregivers’ Burden and Educational Level

We investigated the association between the education of informal caregivers’ (IC) and their physical and mental burden. We hypothesized that better-educated IC would have more resources available to manage the care situation and as a result show lower perceived burden. We conducted a population survey of 6,087 German residents aged 18+ years, 966 of whom reported to be IC. Results show that IC felt more often mentally than physically burdened.

Wed, 09/11/2019 - 13:30

Refining caregiver vulnerability for clinical practice: determinants of self-rated health in spousal dementia caregivers

Background: Caregivers of a family member with a chronic disability or illness such as dementia are at increased risk for chronic disease. There are many factors that contribute to dementia caregiver vulnerability and these factors can be challenging to assess in clinical settings. Self-rated health (SRH) is an independent measure of survival and physical health in the elderly. As an inclusive measure of health, SRH has been proposed as a reliable way to assess a patient's general health in primary care.

Tue, 07/02/2019 - 16:02

The Mediating Role of Sleep Quality on Well-Being Among Japanese Working Family Caregivers

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the well-being of caregivers is mediated by the association between behavioral and psychological symptoms in elderly relatives and the quality of sleep experienced by caregivers using a mediational model. The participants were 105 working family caregivers in Japan. We assessed well-being based on the Kessler Scale 10, self-rated health, and satisfaction in daily life. Our results showed that the well-being in working family caregivers was impacted by the severity of behavioral and psychological symptoms in elderly relatives.

Tue, 05/14/2019 - 13:40

Social support and self-rated health of African American women informal caregivers: urban and rural differences

In this study, the authors examined how geographic location might differently influence social support and self-rated health for rural and urban African American women caregivers. They used cross-sectional data from 253 urban and 263 rural women primary caregivers. Controlling for key demographic factors, the authors regressed caregivers’ self-rated health on social engagement, structural, and functional aspects of social support for urban and rural caregivers separately. The perception of family functioning was positively associated with urban and rural caregivers’ self-rated health.

Sat, 05/04/2019 - 11:04

Does the Health of Adult Child Caregivers Vary by Employment Status in the United States?

Objective: This study investigates whether the health effects of informal caregiving for aging parents vary by employment status in the United States. Two opposing hypotheses are tested: dual role strain and role enhancement.; Method: Using national longitudinal data from the U.S.

Tue, 02/05/2019 - 11:13