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A comparative study of stress and unmet needs in carers of South Asian and white adults with learning disabilities

People with learning disabilities have high dependency needs and high prevalence of physical, psychological and social morbidities. Some studies have shown that South Asian and white populations have a similar prevalence of learning disabilities and related psychological morbidity (McGrother et al, 2002), although other studies have shown an increased prevalence of severe levels of learning disabilities in the South Asian population (Emerson et al, 1997).

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Carers and the NHS

The huge role of unpaid family carers is outlined in this essay, together with examples of good practices by NHS organisations to support their needs. The authors point out that with declining NHS resources there will be even more reliance on family carers. 

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

Carer's aspirations and decisions around work and retirement

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) commissioned the Social Policy Research Unit at the University of York to conduct research exploring the aspirations and decisions around work and retirement of people looking after disabled or sick relatives, friends, or older people. The study involved three elements: a literature review; in-depth interviews with 80 carers; and focus groups with professionals from Jobcentre Plus, social services departments and carers organisations who worked with carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

MyCare: the challenges facing young carers of parents with a severe mental illness

Adults with severe and enduring mental health problems are amongst the most marginalised and vulnerable people in our society. In providing care for these individuals, mental health professionals may potentially overlook the fact that many of these people are also parents: • There are an estimated 50,000 – 200,000 young people in the UK caring for a parent with mental health problems. • Many of these young people will provide help and support for a parent. • Some of these young people will be providing care beyond a level that is appropriate for their age. They will be ‘young carers’.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11