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Severe mental health problems

Using psychosocial interventions within a high-security hospital

Psychosocial interventions have been used for many years in caring for people with mental health problems. The few interventions that have a recognised evidence base are cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), family interventions, and education programmes for patients and carers. Describes the process of implementing these interventions in a forensic setting and makes recommendations for future practice. Outlines the training provide to staff and the importance of adequate staffing levels.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Treatment orders leave carers anxious

Supervised community treatment, to be introduced under the new Mental Health Act 2007, is intended to help revolving door patients stay out of hospital by requiring them to accept treatment in the community. This article highlights fears that this may increase the burden on carers.  Carers will not be involved in the decision behind giving a treatment order and may not understand what support is available to them.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

'Mum I used to be good looking... look at me now': the physical health needs of adults with mental health problems: the perspectives of users, carers and front-line staff

This study uses focus groups of users, carers, and structured staff interviews to explore the physical health needs of mental health services users and the barriers that make it hard for them to seek or gain access to services. Results found that despite the inextricable link between physical well-being and mental health, professionals in both primary and secondary care fail to view users holistically. Professional role ambiguity and poor communications result in access difficulties for users and add to the burden felt by carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Experiences of 'care' in mental health

The concept of care has attracted considerable interest and there has been growing attention both to the needs of carers and how they may sometimes conflict with those of service users. Draws on initial research findings to examine experiences of care in mental health for men and women and for carers and users.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Psychological distress and subjective burden of caregivers of people with mental illness: the role of affiliate stigma and face concern

This study examined the internalization of stigma among carers of people with severe mental health problems experiencing stigma. One hundred and eight Chinese caregivers in Hong Kong were surveyed. Affiliate stigma was found to serve as a partial mediator between face concern and caregiver distress and a full mediator between face concern and subjective burden. Cultural linkage of stigma and caregiver outcomes was identified, suggesting that researchers and practitioners should use a culturally sensitive approach to understand caregivers’ experience and alleviate their stigma.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

What's in a name

Argues why the nearest relative role has important lessons for the roles of the nominated person and carer which will replace it in the next Mental Health Act.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Understanding the impact of an Assertive Outreach Team on couples caring for adult children with psychosis

Carers play an essential role in the lives of people suffering from mental health problems. Caring is very often a relational activity carried out by family members. Assertive Outreach (AO) services ought to be particularly well placed to support carers, but their impact upon families is not well understood. We set out to understand the intervention of AO services from a family perspective, and in particular to explore its meaning from the perspectives of pairs of carers. Three pairs of carer-parents participated in six individual open-ended interviews.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

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