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Social isolation

Silent, invisible and unacknowledged: experiences of young caregivers of single parents diagnosed with multiple sclerosis

The study's rationale: Most people diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) choose to live at home without known consequences for their children.

Aims and objectives: To study the personal experience of being a young caregiver of a chronically ill parent diagnosed with MS.

Methodological design and justification: Phenomenology was the methodological approach of the study since it gives an inside information of the lived experience.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:20

Patterns of exclusion of carers for people with mental health problems - the perspectives of professionals

A major issue in research, policy and professional practice is the social exclusion of carers, in particular carers for people with mental health problems. In order to address the issue of social exclusion from the perspectives of professionals, 65 participants were interviewed. The sample included directors, managers and senior staff from the social care, health and voluntary sectors. Respondents were asked to comment at length on the social exclusion of carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Youth South Asians with learning disabilities: still socially excluded?

This paper report on a study undertaken in Glasgow of young South Asian people with learning disabilities and their carers, and explores the extent to which they are socially excluded. Although there is an increasing political emphasis on the inclusion of people with learning disabilities, the families concerned continue to experience isolation, both socially and in terms of service provision. Access to service is often problematic, because of linguistic and cultural barriers and families appear to be reluctant to use day centres.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

People with intellectual disabilities living in generic residential services for older people in the UK

Background  As part of a UK programme of work focusing on older people with intellectual disabilities, the circumstance of those who reside in generic services for older people were investigated.

Materials and methods  Questionnaires were sent to 2570 residential and nursing homes in 53 local authorities across the UK.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Attendance, achievement and participation: Young carers' experiences of school in Australia

Schools play an important part in the lives of children and young people who have caring responsibilities for a family member with an illness, disability, alcohol or other drug problem or mental health condition but many of these ‘young carers’ report difficulty in attending, achieving and participating in education. This qualitative research project aimed to gather young carers' views about school, the challenges they face in engaging with education and their peers, and ways that the system might better support others like them.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

The quality of life of carers of patients with severe lung disease

Severe lung disease is known to affect the lives of not only the sufferer but also his/her family. This qualitative phenomenological study identified seven patients with severe lung disease and studied the quality of life of their carers (five female, two male) who were not fully employed, living in the same house or nearby. In a semistructured interview, the carers were asked about looking after their spouse or relative, whether they had support and the effect of caring on their health and finances.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Recognition and support of carers

May carers are isolated and GP surgeries are often their first point of contact for support and resources. This article describes the role of a carer support and development worker, whose aim is to provide the support carers need. Cites 19 references. [Journal abstract]

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Young, gifted, and caring: A project narrative of young carers, their mental health, and getting them involved in education, research and practice

Young carers are a global phenomenon. The UK estimates it has in excess of 175 000 young carers, the onset of their caring role often occurring between 8 and 10 years of age. Of these, 17 000 are caring for a parent who has severe mental illness, a significant factor for children entering the health and social care system, as up to 60% experience mental health difficulties themselves. This paper reports on the outcome of a participatory project aimed at better understanding the needs of young people.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Impact of home based long term care on informal carers

Background: Well coordinated and integrated home based care is an efficient and cost effective model for providing long term care. There is, however, emerging evidence to suggest that family members pay a price for taking on long term care responsibilities at home.; Objective: This article draws on published literature to provide an overview of the health, economic, and social issues faced by informal carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Quality of life and social isolation among caregivers of adults with schizophrenia: policy and outcomes

Services have been increasingly directed at supporting carers of people living with mental illness but it is difficult to evaluate the impact of service change where benchmarks for carer functioning are sparse. Sixty Australian carers were assessed regarding their quality of life, psychological distress, social isolation and caregiving experience. Their scores were compared with two matched community samples and previous studies. Carers were ten times more likely to be socially isolated and quality of life was significantly less than matched community samples.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10