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Social networks, befriending and support for family carers of people with dementia

Social networks are seen to influence the use of health and social care services. In a secondary analysis of data from a longitudinal study of befriending of carers of people with dementia, the authors studied the relationship between network type and support from family/friends, voluntary sector befriending and residential/nursing care. Using Wenger's typology of social networks, finding suggest that the pattern of support use varies by differences in the structure of networks.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

De Caf: a meeting place and therapeutic resource

Penny Redwood, Diana Robinson and Jane Price describe the development of a dementia cafe in Leeds – a meeting place where people with dementia and their carers can spend an enjoyable time, share problems and obtain information and support

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Support network transformations in the first stages of the caregiver's career

The purpose of this article is to propose a method to facilitate analysis of the processes involved in the transformation of support networks for caregivers of persons with dementia. The authors are particularly interested in the preliminary phases of the caregiver's career: the initial period ranging from the first manifestations of dementia to the confirmation of a diagnosis. This method combines the social network approach with narratice analysis.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Factors associated with family caregivers' burden and depression in Korea

This study determines the relative effects of functional impairment, cognitive impairment, and duration of care of the elderly on caregivers' depression, and identifies the factors that influence this relationship. The variables were entered individually, based on a logical order in the path modeling. For mediators, the order of three types of social support was assumed to be financial support, instrumental support, and emotional support.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

A cuppa in the country

The author, a community mental health nurse, describes the setting up of a dementia cafe in a rural area. Some of the aims and objectives of the cafe were to provide social opportunities for those living with dementia and their carers; provide activities to stimulate memories of those living with dementia; provide an opportunity for carers to share problems. Challenges and future changes are also discussed.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

What does ‘neighbourhood’ mean for carers of people with dementia?

Richard Ward, Andrew Clark and Matthew Hargreaves outline the findings of a study that looked at how carers of people with dementia relate to their neighbourhood, and the implications that has for improving local support

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Navigating health and care: living independently with long term conditions: an ethnographic investigation: interim findings

An evaluation exploring the lives of older people living with multiple long term conditions, assessing how well the health and care system is meeting their needs. The evaluation heard the views of 36 patients, family members and carers in order to gain an insight into their experiences of living with and managing their long term conditions and the care they receive.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Support for Alzheimer's caregivers

Objective: Information on the shortened, 20-item version of the Perceived Social Support Scale (S-PSSS) is scarce. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the psychometric properties of the S-PSSS Family (SSfa) and Friends (SSfr) subscales. Method: Because of their common coping method of social support, a cross-sectional sample of Alzheimer’s caregivers was relevant for this evaluation.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

'I realised that I wasn't alone': the views and experiences of young carers from a social capital perspective

The concept of social capital is very much an ‘adult’ concept, created by adults for adults, with children as the passive recipients of, primarily, parental social capital. The concept has been broken down into three particular subcategories – bonding (getting by), bridging (getting on) and linking (getting around). However, these subcategories equally do not relate readily to children and young people nor to different groups of young people.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:08

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