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Social responsibility

Older Caregivers and Guardianship: A Primer

Older caregivers may be unfamiliar with guardianship, and may not know if it could help or hinder their caregiving. This article explores questions that professionals who are counseling older caregivers should ask, including whether guardianship is needed or if there is a less restrictive option; whether the caregiver should petition and what to expect of the court proceeding; whether the caregiver should take on the legal responsibility of serving as guardian; and what happens in case of family conflict, abuse by a guardian, or inability of a guardian to continue serving.

Wed, 06/05/2019 - 15:51

Applying the convoy model to support in care situations

This article considers the future of informal care situations, with a special focus on how social networks can support caring. Noting demographic changes and the endemic need for informal support, we outline the convoy model of social relations for proactive planning and contemporaneous caring. The article is grounded in empirical evidence, including comparative findings from four countries and about caring among two uniquely vulnerable populations: latelife remarried couples and lesbian and gay adults.

Fri, 05/24/2019 - 09:19

Who is responsible for providing care? Investigating the role of care tasks and past experiences in a cross-sectional survey in the Netherlands

Background: Many countries face substitution from formal to informal care. It is essential that a sufficient number of caregivers, such as family, friends or neighbors, are willing and able to lend care to address the needs of ill or elderly persons.

Fri, 10/19/2018 - 15:55

More family responsibility, more informal care? The effect of motivation on the giving of informal care by people aged over 50 in the Netherlands compared to other European countries

Against the backdrop of ongoing population ageing, informal care occupies an important place on European political agendas. This article discusses informal caregiving by middle aged and older persons in the Netherlands and other European countries, with particular emphasis on the role played by motives. The data are drawn from SHARE. Our results show that in the Netherlands, it is mainly feelings of being needed and obligation that increase the chance of informal care being given. Deriving pleasure from an activity, by contrast, reduces the likelihood.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Young carers

Alex Fox highlights the hidden struggles of young carers and the signs health practitioners can look out for to identify those who need support.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09