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Social support

The Burden of Primary Caregivers of Spinal Muscular Atrophy Patients and Their Needs

Aim: This study aims to reveal the problems faced by families of children with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), by evaluating their care burden, needs, and expectations. Materials and Methods: The participants were the primary caregivers of 34 children between the ages of 0 and 18 years diagnosed with SMA. Thirteen children were diagnosed with type 1, 13 children with type 2 and 8 children with type 3 SMA. Data on the medical history, functional levels of the participants, and the characteristics of families were collected.

Sat, 01/15/2022 - 13:55

Burden and social support in informal caregivers of people undergoing kidney dialysis: a mixed study

Objectives: to analyze the burden and the social support of the informal caregivers of people undergoing kidney dialysis. Methods: mixed study, based on the Theory of Stress and Overload, using instruments of sociodemographic characterization, the Social Support Survey from the Medical Outcomes Study, Zarit's Burden Scale, and guiding questions. Analysis of data used statistical and thematic inferences.

Fri, 01/14/2022 - 19:37

Association between the social support for mothers of patients with eating disorders, maternal mental health, and patient symptomatic severity: A cross-sectional study

Background: Although caregivers of patients with eating disorders usually experience a heavy caregiving burden, the effects of social support on caregivers of patients with eating disorders are unknown. This study aimed to investigate how social support for mothers who are caregivers of patients with an eating disorder improves the mothers’ mental status and, consequently, the symptoms and status of the patients. Methods: Fifty-seven pairs of participants were recruited from four family self-help groups and one university hospital in Japan.

Thu, 01/13/2022 - 12:18

Antecedents and Outcomes of Enrichment Among Working Family Caregivers of People With Dementia: A Longitudinal Analysis

Objectives: Despite evidence of negative aspects of the work–caregiving interface (e.g. work–family conflict) among family caregivers of people with dementia (PWD), little is known about the positive aspects (e.g. enrichment). We examined antecedents and outcomes of family-to-work enrichment (FWE) and work-to-family enrichment (WFE) among working family caregivers of PWD. In terms of antecedents, we investigated whether factors that alleviated work–family conflict increased enrichment.

Wed, 12/15/2021 - 10:57

Understanding Resilience Factors Among Caregivers of People with Alzheimer's Disease in Spain

Introduction: Alzheimer's disease (AD) caregivers resilience involves the interaction between different risk and protective factors. Context of care, objective stressors, perceived stressors caregiver assessment, mediators factors and consequences of care were associated with resilience. We have developed a more integrated and operational conceptual model of resilience and care than previous models in our sociocultural environment.

Tue, 04/13/2021 - 13:21

A systematic review of the provision and efficacy of patient and carer information and support (PCIS) interventions for patients with dementia and their informal carers

Background: The NHS dementia strategy identifies patient and carer information and support (PCIS) as a core component of gold-standard dementia care. This is the first systematic review of PCIS, performed to analyse the literature and evidence for these interventions.; Aims: To systematically review literature evaluating the effectiveness of the provision of PCIS for people with dementia and their informal carers, in inpatient and outpatient settings.; Methods: Searches of four online biomedical databases, accessed in September 2018.

Tue, 04/13/2021 - 11:56

A multilevel mixed effects analysis of informal carers health in Australia: the role of community participation, social support and trust at small area level

Background Informal carers suffer from worse health outcomes than non-carers due to their caregiving role. Yet, in a society carers health is as important as that of their care recipients. This study investigated the self-assessed mental and general health outcomes of informal carers in Australia. It evaluated the influence of carers' personal social capital- a logically linked sequence of their social behaviour such as community participation, social support and trust in others- on their health outcomes.

Tue, 04/06/2021 - 10:41

Health literacy, social support, and care ability for caregivers of dementia patients: Structural equation modeling

At present, the level of health literacy, social support, and care ability of dementia caregivers is not very high. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to construct a structural equation model to explore the relationship between health literacy, social support, and the care ability of dementia caregivers. It is hoped that the study will provide a theoretical basis for future intervention. We recruited 225 dementia patients and their caregivers from August 2018 to June 2019 at the Department of Geriatrics and Neurology.

Mon, 03/29/2021 - 16:01

Assessing Grief in Family Caregivers of Individuals With Alcohol Use Disorder or Substance Use Disorder using the Marwit-Meuser Caregiver Grief Inventory Short Form (MM-CGI-SF)

This study assessed grief in caregivers of family members with alcohol use disorder (AUD) and substance use disorder (SUD) using the Marwit-Meuser Caregiver Grief Inventory Short Form (MM-CGI-SF). We used snowball sampling to recruit participants who had family members with AUD and SUD. The sample was comprised of 100 caregivers of family members with AUD and 75 caregivers of family members with SUD. The original MM-CFI-SF was modified by changing the wording to reflect those with AUD and SUD.

Tue, 03/09/2021 - 15:40

Young adult cancer caregivers' use of social media for social support

Objective: To describe how young adult cancer caregivers (YACC) use social media for social support during a cancer experience. Methods: Eligible YACC were 18 to 39 years, used Facebook and/or Instagram at least once per week, and cared for an adult cancer patient diagnosed 6 months to 5 years prior (N = 34). Recruitment of a cross-sectional sample occurred through oncology clinics in Utah and online advertising by caregiving and cancer organizations from September 2017 to June 2018.

Fri, 01/22/2021 - 16:37

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