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Social work practice with carers

Website providing a range of resources to help support social work practice with carers. It aims help social workers to develop a better understanding of the issues carers face and provides tools to help put this learning into practice. Resources cover general information about social work with carers, links to resources about social work law and practice, tools and training materials. The site also includes five case studies which illustrate how social work can provide support to carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Working with families in mental health: some pointers from research

This article looks at one model of how mental health professionals relate to carers and families.  It then goes on to consider some research on aspects of the family environment, and the impact that mental illness has on how clients and families relate to one another.  Finally it offers suggestions as to how this material might be relevant to our approach to social work in mental health.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Supporting carers: the social worker

This film focuses on the work of Nicola James, a social worker for Surrey County Council. Nicola works with disabled young adults and their carers. She introduces us to Caroline Hunter, who cares for her son, who is autistic and has severe learning disabilities. Nicola’s work with the Hunter family demonstrates how considering the needs of both the service user and the carer can have a positive impact on the whole family.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Joint working success

Looks at how health professionals, social services and the voluntary sector are all working together to support people with dementia and their carers at the Petersfield Centre in Harold Hill in north-east London.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Understanding why carers' assessments do not always take place

Recent pronouncements from both government and carers' organisations have expressed disappointment at the low numbers of carers' assessments being undertaken by social care practitioners. The reasons offered for this are varied. They commonly tend to emphasise issues of bureaucratic incompetence, for example the failure by Social Services Departments to provide information to carers about their rights, or else highlighting practitioner attitudes that are out of step with current thinking, for example wanting to retain decision-making power and not involving carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

"Caring for you, caring for me": a ten-year caregiver educational initiative of the Rosalynn Carter Institute for Human Development

This article describes a caregiver education program that includes both family and professional caregiver issues developed by the Rosalynn Carter Institute for Human Development in the United States. In the program there are modules designed too bring professional and family caregivers together for a better appreciation of collaboration and teamwork; discussions of the meaning of caregiving; a module looking at how well carers are looking after themselves; modules focusing on building collaborative relationships with other caregivers; problem solving; and accessing resources.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Happy and excited despite heavy caring commitment

This article focuses on a 2007 survey by "Community Care" which found that almost half of young carers will spend a number of hours caring for another member of their family on Christmas Day. Forty-six per cent of young carers have not talked to a social worker in the last year about the support they need, according to the survey of 109 young carers aged eight-16 in Great Britain. The survey also revealed reluctance among young carers to want more professional support.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Listen to the true voices

Drawing on the case of a women who was brain injured following a traffic accident being cared for by her husband, this article highlights why it is important that social workers listen to carers when assessing caring situations. Carers need social workers who can listen to them and can learn from them.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

An education programme for social care staff: improving the health of people who have a learning disability and epilepsy

This article will describe and examine course feedback from a local training initiative, which contributes to the improvements in the health status of people with a learning disability, who have epilepsy. The aim is to analyse how an education programme that focused on epilepsy and its management, together with a borough wide epilepsy protocol developed the skills of the local workforce. This education programme provided a framework for social care staff, enabling them to work both safely and effectively in their support of individuals with learning disabilities that have epilepsy.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:08

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