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Symptom management

'Take more laxatives was their answer to everything': A qualitative exploration of the patient, carer and healthcare professional experience of constipation in specialist palliative care

Background: Constipation is a major problem for many older adults, more so for those who are receiving specialist palliative care. However, limited research reports the subjective experiences of constipation, despite evidenced differences between the healthcare professional and patient/carer perspective. Aim: The main aim of this study is to explore the experience of how constipation is assessed and managed within specialist palliative care from the patient, carer and healthcare professional perspective.

Thu, 01/14/2021 - 14:48

Mobile applications for managing symptoms of patients with cancer at home: A scoping review

Background Education plays an important role in cancer symptom management for patients and their families. With the advancement of information and communication technology, there may be additional evidence for the use of mobile apps to support patient and family education. Purpose The purpose of this review was to explore and synthesize scientific literature about cancer symptom management mobile apps that can be used by patients and their families.

Fri, 12/11/2020 - 18:05

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Symptom Interference in Advanced Lung Cancer and Caregiver Distress: A Pilot Randomized Trial

Context: Advanced lung cancer patients typically have a poor prognosis and many symptoms that interfere with functioning, contributing to high rates of emotional distress in both patients and family caregivers. There remains a need for evidence-based interventions to improve functional outcomes and distress in this population.; Objectives: This pilot trial examined the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of telephone-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for symptomatic, advanced lung cancer patients and their distressed family caregivers.

Wed, 09/11/2019 - 12:43

How family caregivers of cancer patients manage symptoms at home: A systematic review

Introduction Cancer affects not only the patient, but also the whole family, especially when a member of the family assumes the role of the family caregiver. This puts an additional emotional, social and financial strain on the family caregivers. Family caregivers of cancer patients are actively involved in the care provided at the home setting through various ways including practical tasks, symptom management and care coordination.

Mon, 04/08/2019 - 11:35

Pattern Versus Change: Community-Based Dyadic Heart Failure Self-Care

It is imperative that dyadic heart failure (HF) self-care be carefully examined so we can develop interventions which improve patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively examine how patient/informal caregiver dyads mutually engage in managing the patient's HF at home. Twenty-seven dyads were interviewed using a theoretically derived interview guide. All interviews were digitally recorded and professionally transcribed, and iterative thematic analysis was conducted.

Wed, 01/23/2019 - 16:03

What We Do: Key Activities of an Outpatient Palliative Care Team at an Academic Cancer Center

Background: Outpatient palliative care (PC) has been shown to positively impact quality of life and decrease healthcare utilization, but there are limited data describing what activities render these benefits. Objective: Describe the topics addressed by an outpatient PC team during scheduled visits. Design: Longitudinal cohort study. Setting: The Symptom Management Service, an ambulatory PC program at an academic comprehensive cancer center.

Thu, 08/30/2018 - 13:00

Considerations in developing and delivering a non-pharmacological intervention for symptom management in lung cancer: the views of health care professionals

Background: A respiratory distress symptom cluster has recently been identified in lung cancer associated with breathlessness, cough and fatigue, and the study reported here is part of a wider body of work being undertaken to develop a novel non-pharmacological intervention (NPI) for the management of this symptom cluster. The current paper reports the views of health care professionals (HCPs) involved with cancer care regarding the most appropriate ways of developing and delivering such a novel intervention.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23