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Telecare

The eCare Client Impact Survey (eCCIS) - Developing a new Tool for assessing Client Impacts of Telehealthcare

Telehealthcare is an increasingly popular option for health and social care organisations providing care to people in their own homes, principally providing the means to improve both the quality and efficiency of care services. However, the evidence-base for the impacts of telehealthcare in terms of general quality of life , well-being and satisfaction for older people and informal carers remains patchy. We argue that the impacts of telehealthcare lie in certain specific areas not sufficiently covered by existing measures.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Carers and telecare

By looking at carers’ experiences, this report takes this case forward by exploring in more detail the evidence and opportunities afforded by telecare and telehealth technologies and the barriers to greater take-up.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

A weight off my mind: exploring the impact and potential benefits of telecare for unpaid carers in Scotland

A study looking at telecare from a carers' viewpoint is briefly reviewed in this article. The study drew on the experiences of carers through interviews and focus groups. It identified that some stakeholders, notably healthcare professionals, lacked awareness of the value and availability of telecare and that this often resulted in limited referrals and a limited range of telecare equipment accessed by carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

Ethical issues in the use of fall detectors

Fall detectors are a form of remote monitoring assistive technology that have the potential to enhance the wellbeing of adults at risk from falling. In this paper, the ethical issues raised by the use of fall detectors are examined. The fall detection devices currently available are outlined, and a summary of how these devices require social-care services, or family carers, to respond in particular ways, is provided. The ethical issues associated with the use of fall detectors are classified under four headings: autonomy, privacy, benefit, and the use of resources.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

Using technology to support people at risk of falling

In 2012 it was estimated 800 people fell daily in the West Midlands and fall detectors were an under-used resource. A fall detector does not prevent a fall but sends an alert so that someone knows a person has fallen making a difference to living independently by restoring confidence. There is a direct correlation between recovery and how long people lie on the floor after a fall; the speedier the response, the lower the risk of hospital admission and the shorter the length of hospital stay and subsequent support requirements on discharge.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Ethical issues arising from a research, technology and development project to support frail older people and their family carers at home

The present paper provides an overview of the application of the key ethical issues which arose in an EU-funded research, technology and development project, Assisting Carers using Telematics Interventions to meet Older Persons' Needs (ACTION). The primary aim of the ACTION project was to support frail older people and their family carers in their own homes across England, Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland, Sweden and Portugal via the use of user-friendly information and communication technology.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

A growing care gap? The supply of unpaid care for older people by their adult children in England to 2032

A key feature of population ageing in Europe and other more economically developed countries is the projected unprecedented rise in need for long-term care in the next two decades. There is, however, considerable uncertainty over the future supply of unpaid care for older people by their adult children. The future of family care is particularly important in countries planning to reform their long-term care systems, as is the case in England.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

The role of telemonitoring in caring for older people with long-term conditions

Long-term conditions have a negative effect on the lives of older people and those who care for them. As the population ages, so the prevalence of long-term conditions increases, which presents substantial challenges to providers of health and social care. This article examines how telemonitoring could help to meet some of these challenges. Telemonitoring involves patients at home recording vital signs, for example, blood pressure and pulse, and transmitting this information electronically to nurses based elsewhere.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

The role of telematics in assisting family carers and frail older people at home

The overall aim of the A.C.T.I.O.N. research project (Assisting Carers using Telematic Interventions to meet Older person's Needs) is to maintain or enhance the autonomy, independence and quality of life of frail older and disabled people and their family carers by providing information, advice and support in the home. The authors report on the first phase of evaluation conducted using a case-study approach to test the A.C.T.I.O.N. system in several family carers' homes in Sheffield, England.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Who cares? Moral obligations in formal and informal care provision in the light of ICT-based home care

An aging population is often taken to require a profound reorganization of the prevailing health care system. In particular, a more cost-effective care system is warranted and ICT-based home care is often considered a promising alternative. Modern health care devices admit a transfer of patients with rather complex care needs from institutions to the home care setting.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09