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Telecommunication in medicine

A Knowledge-Based Multimedia Telecare System to Improve the Provision of Formal and Informal Care for the Elderly and Disabled

We have developed a knowledge-based multimedia telecare system, based on a multimedia PC connected by ISDN at 128 kbit/s. The user display is a television. Multimedia material is accessed through a browser-based interface. A remote-control handset is used as the main means of interaction, to ensure ease of use and overcome any initial reservations resulting from ‘technophobia’ on the part of the informal carer. The system was used in 13 family homes and four professional sites in Northern Ireland. The evaluations produced positive comments from the informal carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

PEACEanywhere - Implementing the vision for integrated health and social care

Introduction: The ultimate Vision for Assisted Living is the provision of integrated health and social care, thus allowing health and social care professionals and carers to work in harmony to maximise the people's quality of life. PEACEanywhere one of the Projects under the auspices of the Technology Strategy Board Assisted Living Innovation Platform (ALIP2) sought to progress the vision towards implementation.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

The eCare Client Impact Survey (eCCIS) - Developing a new Tool for assessing Client Impacts of Telehealthcare

Telehealthcare is an increasingly popular option for health and social care organisations providing care to people in their own homes, principally providing the means to improve both the quality and efficiency of care services. However, the evidence-base for the impacts of telehealthcare in terms of general quality of life , well-being and satisfaction for older people and informal carers remains patchy. We argue that the impacts of telehealthcare lie in certain specific areas not sufficiently covered by existing measures.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

The ATHENE Project: The importance of bricolage in personalising assisted living technologies

Introduction: An aging population is fueling interest in assisted living technologies (ALTs) to support independence at home. Numerous ALTs have been developed and deployed, but uptake and use has fallen short of levels predicted by policymakers. A key reason is a lack of understanding of users’ needs. In this paper we report findings from the ATHENE (Assistive Technologies for Healthy Living in Elders: Needs Assessment by Ethnography) project, which is funded by the Technology Strategy Board under its Assisted Living Innovation Platform programme.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

Using technology to support people at risk of falling

In 2012 it was estimated 800 people fell daily in the West Midlands and fall detectors were an under-used resource. A fall detector does not prevent a fall but sends an alert so that someone knows a person has fallen making a difference to living independently by restoring confidence. There is a direct correlation between recovery and how long people lie on the floor after a fall; the speedier the response, the lower the risk of hospital admission and the shorter the length of hospital stay and subsequent support requirements on discharge.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

The role of telemonitoring in caring for older people with long-term conditions

Long-term conditions have a negative effect on the lives of older people and those who care for them. As the population ages, so the prevalence of long-term conditions increases, which presents substantial challenges to providers of health and social care. This article examines how telemonitoring could help to meet some of these challenges. Telemonitoring involves patients at home recording vital signs, for example, blood pressure and pulse, and transmitting this information electronically to nurses based elsewhere.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Development of an integrated external and internal location system with activity monitoring

Although the potential of using location information to support people with dementia has been recognised, the uptake of location technology in this area has been limited compared with the uptake of standard Telecare techniques. The paper examines the reasons for this and describes a project, EASE (Extended Active Support Environment) which was commissioned by NHS South as part of their SBRI for Dementia programme, to develop a system which would address these issues and make location technologies a practical tool to support people with more advanced dementia. 

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Telecare. remote monitoring and care

ABSTRACT Telecare is often regarded as a win/win solution to the growing problem of meeting the care needs of an ageing population. In this paper we call attention to some of the ways in which telecare is not a win/win solution but rather aggravates many of the long-standing ethical tensions that surround the care of the elderly. It may reduce the call on carers' time and energy by automating some aspects of care, particularly daily monitoring. This can release carers for other caring activities. On the other hand, remote and impersonal monitoring seems to fall short of providing care.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09