Skip to content

Toggle service links
Subscribe to RSS - Wales

You are here

  1. Home
  2. Wales

Wales

Carer satisfaction with end-of-life in Powys, Wales: a cross-sectional survey

A cross-sectional postal survey of bereaved carers was conducted in order to examine levels of satisfaction with services provided for people in their last year of life in the rural county of Powys, Wales, UK. A self-complete questionnaire, using a modified version of the Views of Informal Carers – Evaluation of Services instrument was sent to all bereaved carers of all those people dying of cancer in Powys between 1 April 1999 and 30 June 2001. Eight hundred and five (out of a possible of 815 people) were contacted and 407 agreed to receive the questionnaire.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Carer participation in England, Wales and Northern Ireland: a challenge for interprofessional working

Much policy and practice attention has been focused on the participation and involvement of informal carers in service assessment, provision and review. The advent of the National Carers Strategy, the Community Care Delayed Discharge Act, Carers and Disabled Children Act and latterly the Carers (Equal Opportunities) Act have all played their part in giving greater significance to carer involvement. The role of professional cooperation and willingness to see carers as equal partners is a key factor in achieving these objectives.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

A survey exploring the provision of carers' support in medium and high secure services in England and Wales

Although the focus on carers has increased in general psychiatry, the same cannot be said for forensic psychiatry. This is despite the fact that carers of mentally disordered offenders may experience additional pressures including in some cases, being the victim of the patients' crime. A survey of medium and high secure units in England and Wales was conducted to investigate support provided to carers of mentally disordered offenders. Most units provided some form of support, but there was variation in the types and amount of support provided.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

More than a job: working carers: evidence from the 2001 census

In the future most people's lives will include at least one episode of unpaid caring. Find out the facts behind the people who balance their job with caring for a relative or friend.

  • Already, 2.5 million people in England and Wales combine paid work with unpaid caring for a partner, relative or friend who is ill, frail or has a disability.

  • 1.5 million carers work full-time, and of those, 140,000 care for 50+ hours per week.

  • 90% of working carers are aged 30+ - in their prime employment years.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Weekly PQs - Wales/Cymru

The article presents information about the written parliamentary questions from the Welsh Assembly during the period of October 19 to 26, 2006. Questions to the Minister of Culture regarding the quality of Public Libraries, to the Minister of Education regarding the newly-qualified teachers and their answers are presented. Questions regarding support for young carers, number of pupils taking A-levels Science and Mathematics in 2005-06, and risk of fire in schools are also presented.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Who cares? Geographic variation in unpaid caregiving in England and Wales: evidence from the 2001 census

This article investigates the prevalence of unpaid caregiving by local authority district in England and Wales, using data from a new question on caregiving in the 2001 Census. We also examine geographic variation in the characteristics of unpaid care providers including health status, socio-economic status and ethnicity. Results show clear geographic variations in caregiving. The proportion of adults providing more than 20 hours of care per week ranged from less than 2 per cent to nearly 8 per cent.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

A study of the carers strategy (2000): supporting carers in Wales

The Carers Strategies in England and Wales herald opportunities to develop new ways to support carers. This paper reports findings from a five-year study looking at the Carers Strategy in Wales. It presents interview data arising from fieldwork with carers and statutory and voluntary sector staff. Our findings highlight a gap between the positive perceptions of staff concerning improvements in the availability and types of support to carers and carers' everyday experiences.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Young carers short of support in Wales

Reports that young carers in Wales are not receiving support services due to a shortage of resources in councils according to voluntary sector leaders. Reasons for setting up young carers' project; Effects of the insufficient funds on the program according to Lynne Hill, policy director at Children in Wales; Expectations of Hill on the grants that will be provided for the projects.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Current perceptions of respite care: experiences of family and informal carers of people with a learning disability

Access to regular, high-quality respite care has a beneficial impact on a carer’s ability to fulfil their caring role, but provision varies widely. The current study aims to report family and informal carers’ perceptions of respite care services offered to them by their local authority. A mixed method, triangulated design, yielded both quantitative and qualitative data. Members of a parent/carer federation were sent a questionnaire which included a section on ‘respite care’; 151 of 647 responded. Two focus groups were held with 15 carers who had previously completed the questionnaire.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

An emotive subject: insights from social, voluntary and healthcare professionals into the feelings of family carers for people with mental health problems

Caring for people with mental health problems can generate a whole range of positive and negative emotions, including fear, disbelief, guilt and chaos as well as a sense of purpose, pride and achievement. This paper explores the emotions of family carers from the perspectives of social, voluntary and healthcare professionals. Sixty-five participants were interviewed, the sample included directors, managers and senior staff from social, voluntary and healthcare organisations. Participants were encouraged to talk in detail about their understanding of the emotions of family carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10