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Valuing carers: calculating the value of unpaid care

This report updates the estimate of the value of unpaid care published by Carers UK in 2002 in ‘Without Us…? Calculating the value of carers’ support’. Based on data available for the first time at local as well as at national level, and on comprehensive information about the time carers devote to supporting those who need their help, the report reveals just how crucial carers are to the health and social care system and to the UK’s economy. 

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

The cost of unpaid caring

Caring takes time and, as we know, time costs. With an ageing population that is living longer, there is less time and less money to be allocated to older people. This article looks at the role and contribution of informal carers to the social care system, and says that more should be done to recognise their skills and knowledge, and better support should be given to help prevent their ill-health, thus helping to reduce the rising cost of formal care to local social services. 

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

Parents caring for adult children with physical disabilities: the impact of hope and closeness on caregiving benefits

In the present study, we examined 82 parents of adult children with physical disabilities. The parents described the benefits of caregiving, and reported positive feelings about their involvement in caregiving as well as a sense of personal growth as a result of caregiving. When parents perceived caregiving as causing less emotional strain (subjective burden), and when they felt higher levels of closeness with their offspring, and expressed higher levels of hope, they were more likely to indicate that caregiving yielded benefits.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

Money going in, but will care come out?

Safeguards needed if informal carers are to be given cash payments to buy care packages. [(BNI unique abstract)]

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

Carers at the centre

Most health and social services professionals understand that carers play an important part in the care management of a person with an illness or disability, but there needs to be a greater recognition of the personal needs of carers. Roberta Ford gives a personal insight into the work of carers’ support centres.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

Carers' experiences of assertive outreach services: an exploratory study

Background: Recent government policy has highlighted the needs of family and friends who provide support to mental health service users. Carers of assertive outreach (AO) service users may be particularly in need of support. However, little is known about their experiences and how services can support them. Aim: To explore the experiences of carers of individuals receiving an AO service. Method: Ten participants were interviewed using a semi-structured interview schedule.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

Informal care: the views of people receiving care

Informal care is perceived to be the best option for people who require assistance to look after themselves. National and international studies of informal care have focused on the carer, not on the care provided, or the needs and experiences of the care recipients. In the present study, 55 people receiving informal care (21 males and 24 females, mean age = 67.6) were surveyed to determine the type of assistance that they receive, perceptions of the quality of their care, feelings about being looked after by a carer and their perceptions of the services which would be useful.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

'Just be there': hospice caregivers' anticipatory mourning experience

Anticipatory mourning is a phenomenon that has received limited attention. This study is a retrospective, qualitative study of caregivers' perception of this process. Twenty-two participants who had received services from Hospice were interviewed, and themes were identified that elucidate the essence of this phenomenon. Participants reveal what was helpful for them, thus providing insight into potential interventions to support care at the end of life.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

Seeking respite: issues around the use of day respite care for the carers of people with dementia

Ageing in Place policies have transferred responsibility for many frail elderly people and those living with dementia from residential to in-home care. Despite this placing a greater obligation on families, in Australia carers continue to under-use day respite services. This qualitative design study identified issues around the use of day respite care from the perspective of the family carer, focusing on barriers to attendance and strategies to facilitate attendance.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

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