Skip to content

Toggle service links

You are here

  1. Home
  2. 'Ageing-in-place': Frontline experiences of intergenerational family carers of people with dementia

'Ageing-in-place': Frontline experiences of intergenerational family carers of people with dementia

The success of 'ageing-in-place' aged care policy in Australia relies heavily on the unpaid work of informal carers. While there is a wealth of research regarding informal carers more generally, we know relatively little about the experiences of the 'sandwich generation': Adult children (mainly daughters) who provide care for a parent while often juggling paid work and the care of their own children or grandchildren. In this paper I undertake a critical analysis of 'ageing-in-place' policy through the lens of 'sandwich generation' carers of people with dementia. Drawing from a composite case study, I argue that these carers are located at the interstices of powerful discourses such as 'individualisation' and 'care' and explore how the everyday practice of care is negotiated within these spaces. Inhabiting these spaces can be costly for carers and we need to consider how policies can better support intergenerational carers if 'ageing-in-place' is to be sustainable.

Access source material through DOI
Additional Titles
Health Sociology Review

Key Information

Type of Reference
Jour
ISBN/ISSN
1446-1242
Resource Database
Web of science - exported 12/7/2016
Publication Year
2014
Issue Number
1
Volume Number
23
Start Page
43-52