Skip to content

Toggle service links

You are here

  1. Home
  2. A prospective risk assessment of informal carers' medication administration errors within the domiciliary setting

A prospective risk assessment of informal carers' medication administration errors within the domiciliary setting

Increasingly, medication is being administered at home by family and friends of the care-recipient. This study aims to identify and analyse risks associated with potential drug administration errors made by informal carers at home. We mapped medication administration at home with a multidisciplinary team that included carers, health care professionals and patients. Evidence-based risk-analysis methodologies were applied: Healthcare Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (HFMEA), Systematic Human Error Reduction and Prediction Analysis (SHERPA) and Systems-Theoretic Accident Model and Processes (STAMP). The process of administration comprises seven sub-processes. Thirty-four possible failure modes were identified and six of these were rated as high risk. These highlighted that medications may be given with a wrong dose, stored incorrectly, not discontinued as instructed, not recorded, or not ordered on time, and often caused by communication and support problems. Combined risk analyses contributed unique information helpful to better understand the medication administration risks and causes within homecare. Practitioner Summary: Increasingly, medication is being administered at home by family and friends of the care-recipient. This study identifies risks associated with potential drug administration errors made by informal carers at home through consensus-based quantitative techniques. The different analyses contribute unique information helpful to better understand the administration risks and causes.;

Access source material through DOI

Key Information

Type of Reference
Jour
Type of Work
Journal article
Publisher
Informa Healthcare
ISBN/ISSN
1366-5847
Publication Year
2018
Issue Number
1
Journal Titles
Ergonomics
Volume Number
61
Start Page
104
End Page
121