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Who (still) cares? Patterns of informal caregiving to adult dependents in South Korea, 2006-2012

Provision of informal care is declining in South Korea. Informal caregiving is examined in South Korea using longitudinal data. The results are that women with a dependent disengage more from caregiving than men; caregivers are young rather than old, and more frequently live in rural areas. They receive more financial transfers from non-cohabiting relatives and have fewer children than non-caregivers with a dependent adult. Both caregivers and non-caregivers are less likely than those without a dependent adult to give money to non-cohabiting relatives. Educational level does not influence the probability of having a dependent relative or, among people with a dependent, of being a caregiver. Among people with a dependent adult, wage earners are more likely to provide care than the unemployed. The time spent in caregiving depends more on the dependent's demand than on the caregiver's capacity to provide support.

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Key Information

Type of Reference
Jour
Type of Work
Journal article
Publisher
Taylor & Francis
ISBN/ISSN
1744-1730
Publication Year
2020
Issue Number
1
Journal Titles
Asian Population Studies
Volume Number
16
Start Page
17
End Page
33