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Factors associated with overall satisfaction with care at the end‐of‐life: Caregiver voices in New Zealand

In New Zealand, as in other industrialised societies, an ageing population has led to an increased need for palliative care services. A cross‐sectional postal survey of bereaved carers was conducted in order to describe both bereaved carer experience of existing services in the last 3 months of life, and to identify factors associated with overall satisfaction with care. A self‐complete questionnaire, using a modified version of the Views of Informal Carers – Evaluation of Services (VOICES) instrument was sent to 4,778 bereaved carers for registered deceased adult (>18yrs) patients in one district health board (DHB) for the period between November 2015 and December 2016. Eight hundred and twenty‐six completed questionnaires were returned (response rate = 21%). The majority of respondents (83.8%) rated their overall satisfaction with care (taking all care during the last 3 months into account), as high. However, satisfaction varied by care setting. Overall satisfaction with care in hospice was significantly higher compared to other settings. Additionally, patients who died in hospice were more likely to be diagnosed with cancer and under 65 years of age. The factors associated with overall satisfaction with care in the last 2 days of life were: caregiver perceptions of treatment with dignity and respect; adequate privacy; sufficient pain relief and decisions in line with the patient's wishes. A more in‐depth exploration is required to understand the quality of, and satisfaction with, care in different settings as well as the factors that contribute to high/low satisfaction with care at the end‐of‐life.

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Key Information

Type of Reference
Jour
Type of Work
Journal article
Publisher
John Wiley & Sons
ISBN/ISSN
0966-0410
Publication Year
2020
Issue Number
6
Journal Titles
Health & Social Care in the Community
Volume Number
28
Start Page
2320
End Page
2330