Skip to content

Toggle service links

You are here

  1. Home
  2. African-American caregivers' breast health behavior

African-American caregivers' breast health behavior

This study utilizes a stress and coping framework which includes cognitive appraisal, personal and environmental resources, coping and stress to examine factors related to African-American caregivers’ breast cancer screenings, including mammograms, clinical examinations and self-examinations. Using data from the Black Rural and Urban Caregivers Mental Health and Functioning Study, we performed separate logistic regressions for each type of breast cancer screening. Results reveal that having a regular doctor checkup (coping), care recipients having a cancer diagnosis (cognitive appraisal, and living in urban areas (environment resources) are associated with receiving a mammogram. Having greater income, having at least a high school degree (both personal resources) and having a regular doctor checkup (coping) are associated with receiving a clinical examination. Increased caregiver strain (stress), being 40 years old or older, social support (coping) and living in rural areas are associated with performing a self-examination. Targeting African-American caregivers, particularly in rural areas, for increased education on the importance of receiving breast cancer screenings is crucial to addressing health disparities. Making resources available, encouraging caregivers to get a clinical examination and a mammogram and directing public education toward caregivers are important points of intervention.

Access source material through DOI
Additional Titles
Health Education Research

Key Information

Type of Reference
Jour
ISBN/ISSN
0268-1153, 0268-1153
Resource Database
British nursing index bni - exported on 8/7/2016
Publication Year
2009
Issue Number
5
Volume Number
24
Start Page
735-747
Language
English