Skip to content

Toggle service links

You are here

  1. Home
  2. Grande, G.

Grande, G.

Bridging the divide: The adjustment and decision-making experiences of people with dementia living with a recent diagnosis of cancer and its impact on family carers

The risk of living with dementia and, separately, cancer, increases exponentially with age. However, to date, there is a paucity of research investigating the experiences of people living with both these conditions. This study used semi-structured interviews to explore the decision-making and treatment options for people who live with both dementia and cancer. In total, ten people living with both dementia and cancer (aged 39-93 years) and nine family carers were interviewed. Braun and Clarke's approach to thematic analysis was used together with framework matrices to organise the data.

Tue, 05/14/2019 - 15:52

A person-centred approach in nursing: Validity and reliability of the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool

Purpose: The Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) was developed for use among family caregivers in palliative care for assessment of their support needs. The purpose of this study was to translate and evaluate the validity and reliability of the CSNAT in a sample of Swedish family caregivers and nurses in a palliative care context. Methods: Data for this validation study was collected during 2016 in the context of palliative home care in two larger Swedish cities.

Fri, 03/29/2019 - 11:02

Facilitating successful implementation of a person-centred intervention to support family carers within palliative care: a qualitative study of the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) intervention

Background An understanding of how to implement person-centred interventions in palliative and end of life care is lacking, particularly for supporting family carers. To address this gap, we investigated components related to successful implementation of the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) intervention, a person-centred process of carer assessment and support, using Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS) as a theoretical framework.

Wed, 01/30/2019 - 18:30

A randomized controlled trial of a hospital at home service for the terminally ill

This study evaluated the impact of a Cambridge hospital at home service (CHAH) on patients' quality of care, likelihood of remaining at home in their final 2 weeks of life and general practitioner (GP) visits. The design was a randomized controlled trial, comparing CHAH with standard care. The patient's district nurse, GP and informal carer were surveyed within 6 weeks of patient's death, and 225 district nurses, 194 GPs and 144 informal carers of 229 patients responded. There was no clear evidence that CHAH increased likelihood of remaining at home during the final 2 weeks of life.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

Development of a Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) for end-of-life care practice at home: A qualitative study

Background: Current end-of-life care policy and guidance recognises the important contribution of family carers, recommending that their needs should be assessed to support them in their caring role. How regular carer assessment is to be achieved is unclear, particularly because there is no evidence-based tool for directly assessing carers’ support needs that is suitable for use in end-of-life home care practice.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

The Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) for Use in Palliative and End-of-life Care at Home: A Validation Study

Context. Family carers need to be supported in their central role of caring for patients at the end of life, but brief practical tools to assess their support needs have been missing. To address this gap, we developed a brief evidence-based Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) suitable for everyday practice. Objectives. To assess face, content, and criterion validity of the CSNAT and measure sensitivity to change over time. Methods. Participants were 225 adult carers of patients from six U. K. Hospice Home Care services.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Supporting lay carers in end of life care: current gaps and future priorities

Informal carers are central to the achievement of end of life care and death at home and to policy aims of enabling patient choice towards end of life. They provide a substantial, yet hidden contribution to our economy. This entails considerable personal cost to carers, and it is recognised that their needs should be assessed and addressed. However, we lack good research evidence on how best to do this. The present position paper gives an overview of the current state of carer research, its gaps and weaknesses, and outlines future priorities.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

From 'conductor' to 'second fiddle': older adult care recipients' perspectives on transitions in family caring at hospital admission

Background: Family carers provide strong support for many older adults, often enabling older adults to remain at home. Little is known about the care recipients’ perspectives of the role and contributions of family carers, particularly when hospital admissions occur as part of end of life care.

Aim: This paper explores the meanings of family caring for care recipients by drawing on older adults’ perspectives about the impact of hospital admission on established family caring relationships.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09