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Harding, R.

Preferences and Experiences of Muslim Patients and Their Families in Muslim-Majority Countries for End-of-Life Care: A Systematic Review and Thematic

Background. Care for people with progressive illness should be person centered and account for their cultural values and spiritual beliefs. There are an estimated 1.7 billion Muslims worldwide, largely living in low-income and middle-income countries. Aims. This study aimed to identify, appraise, and integrate the evidence for the experiences and preferences of Muslim patients and/or families for end-of-life care in Muslim-majority countries. Design. Systematic review. Data sources.

Tue, 04/06/2021 - 14:47

Family caregivers of advanced cancer patients: self-perceived competency and meaning-making

Background Family caregivers of patients with advanced cancer have been reported to provide long hours of care and be at risk for poor psychological outcomes. Although research has focused on the nature of caregiving burden, little attention has been paid to identifying protective factors that improve caregiver psychological outcomes. Aim We examined the relationship between caregivers' time spent caregiving and the following psychological outcomes: anxiety, depression and caregiving esteem.

Mon, 03/22/2021 - 15:46

'It's a traumatic illness, traumatic to witness': a qualitative study of the experiences of bereaved family caregivers of patients with cutaneous T‐cell lymphoma

Background: Cutaneous T‐cell lymphomas (CTCL) are rare cancers, which can be difficult to diagnose, are incurable and adversely affect quality of life, particularly in advanced disease. Families often provide care, but little is known about their experiences or needs while caring for their relative with advanced disease or in bereavement. Objectives: To explore the experiences of bereaved family caregivers of patients with CTCL.

Mon, 06/03/2019 - 13:48

Experiences of bereaved family caregivers of patients with CTCL

Summary: Cutaneous T‐cell lymphomas (CTCL) are rare types of skin cancer. Skin may develop tumours or ulcers. Sometimes these may cover quite large areas and feel itchy or uncomfortable. Internal body parts may be affected in more advanced disease. Only a few people are diagnosed each year (8 per million), so most GPs do not meet people with this disease. This study from the U.K. aimed to find out about the experiences of family or close friends of people who had died because of the disease (not all people with this disease die of it).

Mon, 06/03/2019 - 13:41

The 90-minute group: Developing a short-term intervention for informal carers of patients with advanced cancer

Caring for someone with an advanced illness has been shown to be stressful. There are few interventions aimed at supporting informal carers. To develop a group intervention that responds to carers’ needs for information and support and to describe its initial activity and response. The group runs from two palliative care services in North and South London. Ten to twelve carers are invited to attend the group that runs over 6 weeks, for 90 min a week. Facilitated by social workers, the content of the sessions is multi-professional.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:22

Clinical notes for informal carers in palliative care: recommendations from a random patient file audit

Although palliative care aims to support family members and informal carers, current evidence suggests that high levels of unmet need persist, and that this population is challenging to work with. This study aimed to 1) measure the proportion of patients that have an informal carer, 2) describe the clinical notes data on existing needs and coping, 3) measure the completeness of assessment data recording, 4) appraise the utility of existing informal carers’ sections in the patient files, and 5) make recommendations for improvement. An audit was conducted reviewing 145 closed patient files.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

What is the best way to help caregivers in cancer and palliative care? A systematic literature review of interventions and their effectiveness

Informal carers in cancer and palliative care are known to have high needs and psychological morbidity, yet a literature review identified few targeted interventions. This systematic review of interventions for carers of patients using home cancer and palliative care services searched Medline, CancerLit, PsycInfo and Cinahl databases. The terms used were carer(s), caregiver(s), palliative and cancer. Papers that reported interventions for adults actively providing informal care for noninstitutionalized cancer and palliative care patients were reviewed.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

Evaluation of a short-term group intervention for informal carers of patients attending a home palliative care service

Despite evidence of high psychological distress and unmet needs, evaluated interventions for informal caregivers in palliative care are few. This study involved an observational outcome evaluation of attendees, and a comparison group, in specialist home palliative care. The measures included carer psychological status and patient physical status at baseline, 8 weeks, and 20 weeks. Qualitative data were collected regarding content, satisfaction with, and impact of intervention. Process data described the uptake, resources, and group activity.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Working with ambivalence: informal caregivers of patients at the end of life

Informal caregivers of patients at the end of life perform a crucial role in maintaining and supporting patients at home. They provide a high level of demanding care, and as a consequence have been shown to have high-level information and support needs themselves. However, they are less often identified as recipients of services than as providers, and little research has addressed how services should be developed to meet their needs. This study aimed to address obstacles in the access to and provision of targeted, appropriate interventions.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10