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Parker, Gillian

Investigating the economic case of a service to support carers of people with dementia: A cross-sectional survey-based feasibility study in England

Carers contribute essential support to enable people with dementia to continue living within the community. Admiral Nurses provide specialist dementia support for carers of people with dementia, including offering expert emotional support and guidance, and work to join up different parts of the health and social care system to address needs in a co-ordinated way. The cost-effectiveness of this service is not clear. We undertook a feasibility study to explore related outcomes and costs for these carers.

Wed, 09/11/2019 - 10:18

Updated meta-review of evidence on support for carers

BACKGROUND: Policy and research interest in carers continues to grow. A previous meta-review, published in 2010, by Parker et al. (Parker G, Arksey H, Harden M. 'Meta-review of international evidence on interventions to support carers.' York: Social Policy Research Unit, University of York; 2010) found little compelling evidence of effectiveness about specific interventions and costs. OBJECTIVE: To update what is known about effective interventions to support carers of ill, disabled or older adults. DESIGN: Rapid meta-review.

Wed, 05/15/2019 - 10:03

Specialist nursing support for unpaid carers of people with dementia: a mixed-methods feasibility study

Background: Unpaid carers are the mainstay of support for people with dementia. Admiral Nursing (AN) is the only specialist nursing service that specifically focuses on supporting such carers, but evidence of its effectiveness, costs and relationships with other health and social care services is limited. This project aimed to address this gap and explore the feasibility of a full-scale formal evaluation.

Sun, 05/05/2019 - 20:06

Updated meta-review of evidence on support for carers

Objective: To update a 2010 meta-review of systematic reviews of effective interventions to support carers of ill, disabled, or older adults. This article reports on the most promising interventions based on the best available evidence. Methods: Rapid meta-review of systematic reviews published from January 2009 to 2016. Results: Sixty-one systematic reviews were included (27 high quality, 25 medium quality, and nine low quality).

Mon, 04/15/2019 - 09:27