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Effectiveness of interventions for co‐residing family caregivers of people with dementia: Systematic review and meta‐analysis

Background/aim: Occupational therapists and health practitioners commonly provide interventions to family caregivers of people with dementia with the aim of relieving burden, depression, and disruptions in health and social support. To date, the effects of multicomponent interventions specifically targeting these four important outcomes has not been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of multicomponent interventions on four outcomes for co‐residing family caregivers of people with dementia.

Thu, 08/23/2018 - 13:31

Recognition of preclinical signs of dementia: A qualitative study exploring the experiences of family carers and professional care assistants

Aims and objectives: To identify preclinical signs of dementia by exploring the experiences of family caregivers and professional care assistants. Background: Dementia results in disability, emotional strain and financial loss for people with dementia, family members and nations. Informal identification of social and behavioural risk signifiers could facilitate timely interventions with potential to delay onset of serious disability. Design: A retrospective qualitative approach using a naturalistic interpretive design was used.

Fri, 08/17/2018 - 15:58

Predictors and moderators of quality of life in caregivers of amputee patients by type 2 diabetes

Background: The amputation of a foot or a leg is one of the complications caused by diabetes that creates fear. After the amputation, the patient becomes dependent on a caregiver, who is often not prepared for this new phase of life. Knowing the factors that influence care delivery in caregivers of amputee type 2 diabetes patients is important from an heuristic point of view, since very few studies have focused on this population.

Wed, 08/15/2018 - 15:41

“You don't look for it”—A study of Swiss professionals’ awareness of young carers and their support needs

While political and public interest in providing support for family carers is growing, so called young carers and young adult carers—young persons under the ages of 18 and 25 respectively—mostly remain unrecognised. Yet, this vulnerable group is in need of special attention and support from professionals in order to get along with the situation of an ill family member and the caring duties they perform.

Wed, 08/15/2018 - 15:07

What do we know about older former carers? Key issues and themes

Despite a significant growth in the number older former family carers, they remain largely invisible in carer-related research and literature. To begin to address this deficit, a four-stage literature review was conducted to identify existing knowledge about older former carers. Narrative synthesis of the findings yielded five themes - the concept of 'older former carer', the legacies of caring, influences on the legacies of caring, conceptualising post-caring and support services for older former carers.

Wed, 08/15/2018 - 13:30

Involved, inputting or informing: 'Shared' decision making in adult mental health care

Background A diagnosis of serious mental illness can impact on the whole family. Families informally provide significant amounts of care but are disproportionately at risk of carer burden when compared to those supporting people with other long-term conditions. Shared decision making (SDM) is an ethical model of health communication associated with positive health outcomes; however, there has been little research to evaluate how routinely family is invited to participate in SDM, or what this looks like in practice.

Wed, 06/06/2018 - 10:20

Mental health academics in the university departments of rural health: Roles and contributions

The author comments on the limited access to Australian mental health care particularly in rural and remote settings. He cites an article by Alexander and Fraser which reports that poor access to specialists and mental health services in some rural settings prevents patients from being treated by their general practitioners. Due to this, the large burden of care falls to families and informal carers. Recommendations on how to improve access to mental health services are also discussed.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:22

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