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Applied social sciences index & abstracts (assia)

Informal Caregiving and Retirement Timing among Men and Women: Gender and Caregiving Relationships in Late Midlife

Informal caregiving, or the provision of unpaid, voluntary care to elderly or disabled family and friends, is an increasingly common experience for both men and women in late midlife. The authors examine the ways in which informal caregiving influences the transition to retirement and how this relationship is shaped by gender. Our data are 763 pension-eligible men and women in the 1994-1995 Cornell Retirement and Well-Being Study.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

Effects of gender and employment status on support provided to caregivers

This study was designed to examine the impact of caregiver gender and employment status on laypeople's willingness to support the caregiver. A total of 216 undergraduates were randomly assigned to read 1 of 4 vignettes that described an individual caring for his or her physically ill spouse. Caregiver gender (man or woman) and employment status (full-time employment or retirement) were manipulated. Overall, female participants reported that they would provide higher levels of support than did male participants, particularly with regard to emotional support.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

Resilience in children of parents with mental illness: Relations between mental health literacy, social connectedness and coping, and both adjustment and caregiving

This study investigated the relationships between resilience factors (mental health literacy, social connectedness, coping strategies) frequently targeted in interventions, and both adjustment (depressive symptomatology, life satisfaction, prosocial behaviour, emotional/behavioural difficulties) and caregiving outcomes in children (12 - 17 years) of a parent with mental illness. Forty-four participants completed questionnaires.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

'If they don't recognize it, you've got to deal with it yourself': gender, young caring and educational support

This article discusses some of the findings of a small-scale, localized, qualitative study involving children and young people identified and processed as young carers, that are providing 'substantial care' for an adult while in primary and/or secondary school. It explores their views on managing to 'care more' whilst at school and the role that teachers and schools do and could play in supporting them. The voices of young carers suggest that educational support should be available 'as soon as' children become primary carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Community relations and child-led microfinance: a case study of caregiving children in Kenya

Rampant levels of AIDS and poverty have made many children in sub-Saharan Africa the primary caregivers of their ageing or ailing guardians. This paper reports on a social action fund initiative that brought caregiving children together to set-up and run income generating activities as a group with the aim of strengthening their coping capabilities.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Employment and caring in British and Norwegian banking: an exploration through individual careers

The continuing expansion of women's employment has increasingly focused attention on the question of how the caring work traditionally carried out by unpaid women will be accomplished. In particular, how can caring responsibilities be combined with a long-term career? In this paper, we assess the significance of the national context through a comparison of the biographies of career bank managers, male and female, in Britain and Norway.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

'What Did We Learn?'

The UK children's commissioners met with 50 children who offered their questions about policy & personal experiences to be answered by the panel. Youths from organizations including the Liverpool Dyslexia Project & Barnardo's Action with Young Carers looked to the panel for more inclusion & further action to benefit their causes. 

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Seeing the invisible children and young people affected by disability

This paper presents a brief review of literature relating to children in families with a disabled member, including the 'young carers' and disability studies literature, and relevant works from the social psychology and sociology of childhood. Key themes identified in the literature are then illustrated by findings from two exploratory research studies that sought to explore the experiences and service needs of children in families with a disabled member, within two Scottish areas.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Examining the trajectories of children providing care for adults in rural Kenya: Implications for service delivery

Research on caregiving children tends to be limited to children's caregiving experiences of parents with a specific disease or disability. This has led to a common perception that children's caregiving is a single, uniform and often long-term experience. Whilst this is most certainly the case for many children in economically more advanced countries, this may not hold true in rural Africa, where poverty and AIDS can have significant knock-on effects on entire families and communities.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Extending direct payments to informal carers: some issues for local authorities

The Carers and Disabled Children Act (2000) has the potential to fundamentally change carers services and the way they are currently delivered. As yet, there is little published work that considers the implications of this Act either for local authorities or informal carers themselves. This paper examines the practical issues involved in the implementation of the Act in terms of: providing equitable services, defining terms, young carers and care package limits, local authority eligibility criteria and whether funding is adequate.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10