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Conflicting agendas between consumers and carers: the perspectives of carers and nurses

Increasingly, Australian government policy advances an expectation that consumer and carer participation will be present in all aspects of mental health service delivery. A review of the literature suggests that consumers and carers actively seek the opportunity to participate but are frequently hampered by barriers. However, government policy documents tend to discuss consumers and carers with regards to participation as though their needs and desires are essentially similar.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

Who cares? A profile of people who care for relatives with a mental disorder

Objective: To profile the Australian adults who are caring for a relative with a mental disorder.

Method: Data came from the 2007 National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing 2007 (NSMHWB), a nationally representative household survey of 8841 individuals aged between 16 and 85 years.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

From Assistance to Prevention: Categorizing Young Carer Support Services in Australia, and International Implications

Young people who provide unpaid care for a relative with chronic illness or disability are a growing focus of public policy and research in Australia and internationally. Support services for these young carers have emerged, but not enough is known about their effectiveness. This article develops an analytical framework that categorizes young carer support services according to their goals and the types of intervention provided. The analytical framework is based on Australian data.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

The effect of unpaid caregiving intensity on labour force participation: Results from a multinomial endogenous treatment model

It is well acknowledged that the intensity of caregiving affects the labour force participation of caregivers. The literature so far has not, however, been able to control effectively for the endogeneity of caregiving intensity. This paper contributes by dealing with the endogeneity of unpaid caregiving intensity when examining its impact on the labour force participation of caregivers. We distinguish between care provided to people who cohabit with the care recipient and care provided to recipients who reside elsewhere, as well as between primary and secondary caring roles.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

The physical functioning and mental health of informal carers: evidence of care-giving impacts from an Australian population-based cohort

Informal carers represent a substantial proportion of the population in many countries and health is an important factor in their capacity to continue care-giving. This study investigated the impact of care-giving on the mental and physical health of informal carers, taking account of contextual factors, including family and work. We examined health changes from before care-giving commenced to 2 and 4 years after, using longitudinal data from the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia survey. The sample comprised 424 carers and 424 propensity score-matched non-carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

What kinds of jobs help carers combine care and employment?

This paper provides information about what job characteristics promote or inhibit maintaining employment while caring. Using a nationally representative longitudinal data set—the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey—the paper traces the effects of the onset of care on labour force participation.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Learn Now; Live Well: an educational programme for caregivers

Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of the Learn Now; Live Well (LNLW) educational programme on enhancing the knowledge and support of caregivers living with a life-threatening illness.

Design: A combined summative and formative evaluation design was used. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected using a questionnaire with a five-point response scale of strongly agree to strongly disagree and semi-structured interviews.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

The association between substance use and the needs of patients with psychiatric disorder, levels of anxiety, and caregiving burden

The influence of substance use on patient's needs and caregiving consequences has received insufficient research attention. We sought to determine whether patients with comorbid substance use have higher levels of need, anxiety, depression, and caregiving consequences than those of patients who do not use substances. A total of 520 patients participated, and those who used substances (n = 216) reported higher levels of unmet needs, anxiety, and caregiving consequences than did patients who did not use substances.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

A time-sovereignty approach to understanding carers of cancer patients' experiences and support preferences

Much of the literature on informal carers of cancer patients is quantitative and psycho-oncology based. This literature has established that cancer carers experience higher rates of stress, depression and anxiety than their non-caregiving counterparts, with younger female carers reporting higher rates of burden and unmet needs. The reasons behind this variation and variations in support preferences are poorly understood: some carers prefer support groups and others prefer practical support. This study takes a sociological approach to exploring carers' varied experiences.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13