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Care management

Planning for the future: Exploring the experiences of older carers of adult children with a learning disability

Accessible summary: There are a large number of adults with learning disabilities who live with and are cared for by their parents.There is a need for interventions to support older carers with their caring role and to plan for a time when they can no longer continue caring.This research looked at a local support service in England that aimed to support carers over 55 who had an adult child with a learning disability living at home.Twelve carers were interviewed individually.The study highlights the unmet needs of older family carers and shows the value of support from a ca

Mon, 01/27/2020 - 13:06

Finding fault: Criticism as a care management strategy and its impact on outcomes for dementia caregivers

Background: Despite a large literature on the stress process, little attention has focused on how caregivers for persons living with dementia (PLWDs) provide care and how this may impact care outcomes. Criticism is a management strategy caregivers may use to respond to behavioral symptoms. We consider whether criticism is associated with caregivers' mental health and service utilization. Methods: Data are drawn from the Advancing Caregiver Training intervention study including 256 informal caregivers living with a PLWD.

Mon, 06/24/2019 - 16:17

The impact of TCARE® on service recommendation, use, and caregiver well-being

Purpose of the Study: Findings are reported from a study that examined the effects of the Tailored Caregiver Assessment and Referral (TCARE®) protocol, a care management process designed to help family caregivers, on care planning and caregiver outcomes. Design and Methods: A longitudinal, randomized controlled trial was conducted with 97 caregivers enrolled in a demonstration project in Georgia. Data included on care plans pertaining to service recommendations, compliance, and use were reviewed.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

Commissioning care services for older people in England : the view from care managers, users and carers

One of the key objectives of the community care reforms of 1990 in the United Kingdom was the development of a flourishing independent sector alongside good quality public services. The aims of the reforms were to increase the available range of options, widen consumer choice and promote independence. The purpose of the study reported here was to examine – from the perspective of older service users, their carers and care managers – experiences at the operational level of arranging, delivering and receiving care services.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

'Listen to what I'm saying': person centred care and the single assessment process

Person centred care means listening to people to find out what is most important to them and without making assumptions. Care is holistic, and centres on the whole person: who they are, their life before, and how they currently feel. The emphasis is on what the person can, rather than cannot do. This video shows health and social care professionals working directly with individuals and their carers. There are no actors, and no prepared scripts. The film shows what a difference a person centred approach makes to individuals with many/complex needs.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

Care management and care provision for older relatives amongst employed informal care-givers

This paper examines care management, or ‘managerial care’, a type of informal care for older adults that has been relatively neglected by researchers. While previous research has acknowledged that care-giving may involve tasks other than direct ‘hands-on’ care, the conceptualisation of managerial care has often been vague and inconsistent. This study is the first explicitly to investigate managerial care amongst a large sample of carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:22

Perceptions and management of change by people with dementia and their carers living at home

This article presents findings from a research study that examined, by observation and interview, the nature of care as a form of social organization in the homes of people with dementia whose care was at least partly provided by relatives or friends. Twenty situations were included in which the carers and people with dementia were interviewed. Each participating pair was observed for an average of nine hours. Change was perceived, on the whole, in negative terms for both caregiver and the person with dementia.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

Would palliative care patients benefit from social workers’ retaining the traditional ‘casework’ role rather than Working as care managers?: a prospective serial qualitative interview study

Social workers have made a significant contribution to the development and delivery of palliative care. Both palliative care and social work are rapidly evolving but, given their changing contexts and increasing workloads, can they sustain compatibility? Advances in treatment of life-threatening illness mean that people live longer in a period of palliative care.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

Using strengths-based practice to support culture change: an Australian experience

Workplaces across the globe have experienced an unprecedented pace of change. The effects of a problem focus, de-personalisation and over regulation in long-term care settings are experienced similarly by carers, residents, their families and nursing homes as a whole. A pathology focus is no longer appropriate, inviting a paradigm shift to explore how accessing the unique strengths and resources of all parties becomes an imperative role in changing organizational culture. This paper draws comparisons between the experiences and tasks of all those involved in care settings.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

Care management, dementia care and specialist mental health services: and evaluation

Objective: To evaluate a model of intensive case management for people with dementia based in a community-based mental health service for older people.

Method: Quasi-experimental design. Individuals in one community team setting received case management and were compared with those in a similar team without such a service. Fortythree matched pairs were identified. Eligible older people and their carers were interviewed at uptake and again at 6 and 12 months.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

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