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How caring for a parent affects the psychosocial development of the young

Aim To investigate the impact of caring for a parent on the psychosocial development of the young person. Methods A total of 20 young carers and 20 non-caregiving peers, aged 11-18 years, were compared on self-report measures of life satisfaction, self-esteem, and behavioural strengths and difficulties. Parental reports on their child's behaviour were obtained and measured. Results Young carers reported lower life satisfaction and self-esteem compared with non-caregiving peers, and their parents rated them as having more difficulties with peer relationships and more emotional symptoms.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

'Your friends don't understand': invisibility and unmet need in the lives of 'young carers'

This paper is based on a study of the experiences of people identified as 'young carers', commissioned by the National Assembly for Wales as part of a wider review of carers' needs and services. Following a brief review of some of the previous research in this area, the paper reports key findings of the research, using the words of children and young people as much as possible.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

How to support young carers

Each week the Social Care Institute for Excellence puts forward research findings in a specific field

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

Adherence to pressure ulcer prevention guidelines in home care: a survey of current practice

Aims and objectives.  To investigate the pressure ulcer prevalence in home nursing patients and to evaluate guideline adherence of measures for the prevention of pressure ulcers and the participation of informal carers in pressure ulcer prevention.

Background.  Since 2002, the Belgian Guideline for the Prevention of Pressure Ulcers was published on the Internet, but no information was available on guideline adherence in home care.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

Young carers' health at risk

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Prevalence and effects of caregiving on children

Aim This paper reports the prevalence and its related sociodemographic factors of informal caregiving by underage children in Austria. The quantity and intensity of caregiving activities, the motivation for and effects of caregiving and how this differs from non-caregiving children were investigated. Background Young carers are a worldwide phenomenon. Due to methodological and sampling problems, little quantitative data are available. Design Cross-sectional, descriptive study.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Children's perceptions and experiences of care giving: a focus group study

The stress of care giving for spouses and adult children has been extensively documented in the empirical literature. More recently attention has been paid to children's involvement in family care giving. Qualitative studies in the social welfare field have highlighted the social restrictions caring places upon children. There remains a need, however, to understand what children are thinking and feeling in an effort to cope with their care-giving demands.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Welfare changes may cost young carers £3,500 a year

Thousands of young carers and their families could lose more than £3,500 a year under proposed welfare reforms, according to The Children’s Society.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12