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Assessment of caring and its effects in young people: development of the Multidimensional Assessment of Caring Activities Checklist (MACA-YC18) and the Positive and Negative Outcomes of Caring Questionnaire (PANOC-YC20) for young carers

Background  Many children, adolescents and young people are involved in caring for parents, siblings, or other relatives who have an illness, disability, mental health problem or other need for care or supervision. The aim was to develop two new instruments for use in research with young carers to assess caring activities and their psychological effects.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Young people supporting parents with mental health problems: experiences of assessment and support

The explosion of interest in young people as carers over the last decade and a half conceals the fact that there are still no reliable estimates of the number of young people with caregiving responsibilities. This is even more problematic in circumstances where the 'looked after' person has a mental health problem. In this study, we reflect on what can be done to identify, assess and support young people in these circumstances.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Young, gifted, and caring: A project narrative of young carers, their mental health, and getting them involved in education, research and practice

Young carers are a global phenomenon. The UK estimates it has in excess of 175 000 young carers, the onset of their caring role often occurring between 8 and 10 years of age. Of these, 17 000 are caring for a parent who has severe mental illness, a significant factor for children entering the health and social care system, as up to 60% experience mental health difficulties themselves. This paper reports on the outcome of a participatory project aimed at better understanding the needs of young people.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Preference for place of death in Germany

Background: Dying in the preferred place is considered a key requirement for a “good death.” The aims of our study were to explore preferred places of death of deceased people and their bereaved relatives in Rhineland-Palatinate (Germany). We further wanted to assess the congruence between preferred and actual place of death.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

'Just Helping': children living with a parent with young onset dementia

Objectives: While the consequences of caring for younger people with dementia have been a growing area of research, little is known about the children of these individuals. This study aimed to discover whether children of younger people with dementia can be compared to other young carers, the impact of their caring on mood, burden and resilience and what could promote coping. Method: In-depth interviews were carried out with 12 participants aged 11-18. A grounded theory methodology was used, supplemented with three quantitative measures.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Access to health and social care services and information

Aim: The aim of this study was to explore carers' perceptions of their ability to access a range of health and social care services, including information about the services. Method: A total of 151 participants, who were all members of a charity set up and run by informal carers of people with learning disabilities, were given semi-structured questionnaires, which yielded qualitative and quantitative data. Further data came from two focus groups.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Relations between social support, appraisal and coping and both positive and negative outcomes in young carers

This study examined a stress/coping model of adjustment in early caregiving. It was hypothesized that better adjustment would be related to higher social support and approach coping, and lower stress appraisals and avoidant coping. One hundred young carers aged 10-25 years completed questionnaires. Predictors included choice in caregiving, social support, stress appraisal and coping. Dependent variables were global distress and positive outcomes (life satisfaction, positive affect, benefits).

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Supporting young carers and their families using a whole family approach

Young carers are children and young people who look after family members with illness, disabilities, mental illness or substance misuse. Many of these young carers help with personal nursing care and administration of medication as well as household tasks and care of younger siblings. Inappropriate levels of caring can impact on a child's own emotional and physical health, educational achievement and life chances.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Many young carers are being punished in schools

The article focuses on young carers who are often punished for poor attendance and punctuality by school staff who do not know about or understand their personal circumstances. It states that more than half of the young carers involved in the study had missed school with 60% saying they had problems with punctuality. It suggests that schools should work with local young carers services to raise awareness of those students who are affected and advises to use student and parent questionnaires.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09