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Chronic disease

Community matrons: patients' and carers' views of a new service

This article presents the results of a survey of patients’ and carers’ views about a community matron service in England. Key themes identified by patients and carers included the reliability of the service, the confidence it gave to patients and carers, improved links with GP services, and anecdotal evidence that the service helped to avoid admission to hospital. The authors believe the survey demonstrates a positive view of the community matron service which justifies continued investment in the role.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Emotional reactions and practical problems of the caregivers of hemodialysed patients

BACKGROUND: The international literature consistently shows that the psychosocial outcomes of the informal carers (caregivers) of chronically ill patients are influenced by factors such as personality traits and perceived social support, but few studies have investigated these variables in the caregivers of hemodialysed patients, and the reciprocal experience of chronicity.; METHODS: Fifty hemodialysed patients and their principal caregivers were recruited.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Applying Risk Society Theory to findings of a scoping review on caregiver safety

Chronic Illness represents a growing concern in the western world and individuals living with chronic illness are primarily managed at home by family caregivers. A scoping review of the home-care literature (2004-2009; updated with review articles from 2010 to January 2013) on the topic of the caregiver revealed that this group experiences the following safety-related concerns: caregivers are conscripted to the role, experience economic hardship, risk being abused as well as abusing, and may well become patients themselves.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Impact of home based long term care on informal carers

Background: Well coordinated and integrated home based care is an efficient and cost effective model for providing long term care. There is, however, emerging evidence to suggest that family members pay a price for taking on long term care responsibilities at home.; Objective: This article draws on published literature to provide an overview of the health, economic, and social issues faced by informal carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Interactive health communication applications for chronic disease: patient and carer perspectives

BACKGROUND: Interactive Health Communication Applications (IHCAs) are computer-based, usually web-based, information packages for patients that combine health information with at least one of social support, decision support, or behaviour change support. These are innovations in health care and their effects on health are uncertain.

OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of IHCAs for people with chronic disease.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Who cares in England and Wales? The Positive Care Law: cross-sectional study

Background: The inverse care law proposing that medical services are distributed inversely to population health needs, and that this law operates more completely where medical care is most exposed to market forces, was first suggested by Tudor Hart in 1971. This paper considers whether an inverse care law can be observed for the provision of informal care as well as for medical care.

Aim: Using data from the 2001 census we sought to investigate the contemporary relevance of the inverse care law.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Correlates of care relationship mutuality among carers of people with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease

Aim.  This paper presents findings from secondary analysis of longitudinal data on correlates of care relationship mutuality collected from 91 carers of people with Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease in the control group of a randomized trial of home-care skill training.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

The value of informal care: a further investigation of the feasibility of contingent valuation in informal caregivers

Including informal care in economic evaluations is increasingly advocated but problematic. We investigated three well-known concerns regarding contingent valuation (CV): (1) the item non-response of CV values, (2) the sensitivity of CV values to the individual circumstances of caring, and (3) the choice of valuation method by comparing willingness-to-pay (WTP) and willingness-to-accept (WTA) values for a hypothetical marginal change in hours of informal care currently provided.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

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