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Community care

What patients and carers want to know: an exploration of information and resource needs in adult mental health services

Objective: The objectives of this study were to: (i) obtain baseline data on the extent of carer involvement across a representative sample of hospital and community patients within an integrated area health service; and (ii) examine perspectives on discharge planning and community care among patients and their carers to identify information and resources they consider important.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:20

A critical consideration of the cash for care agenda and its implications for social services in Wales

This paper considers cash for care as reflected in direct payments and the more recent development of individual budgets in England. While the momentum to roll out individual budgets gathers pace in England, Wales has embarked on a more cautious approach in wishing to evaluate the impact of individual budgets on social services. The paper identifies some of the far reaching implications of cash for care in general and individual budgets in particular, for service users, carers ‐ both paid and informal ‐ and for the social work profession.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:20

The impact of information and communication technology on family carers of older people and professionals in Sweden

Government policy in Sweden, as in other developed countries, pays increasing attention as to how best to support the family carers of older people. New and innovative means of support, such as information and communication technology, are emerging. This paper explores the perceived benefits of, and barriers to, information technology as a means of supporting family carers of older people.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:20

SCIE research briefing 12: involving individual older patients and their carers in the discharge process from acute to community care: implications for intermediate care

This web-based briefing provides a concise summary of the research and policy literature into the means, benefits and difficulties of involving patients in the planning of discharge to community or intermediate care. It also considers the role of carers in this process, as well as what happens when an older person’s ability to communicate their preferences in these matters is affected by dementia, language difficulties, or an unwillingness or reluctance to express preferences about the provision of care.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Informal caregivers' participation when older adults in Norway are discharged from the hospital

This paper describes the participation of informal caregivers in the discharge process when patients aged 80 and over who were admitted from home to different hospitals in Norway were discharged to long-term community care. Data for this cross-sectional survey were collected through telephone interviews with a consecutive sample of 262 caregivers recruited between October 2007 and May 2009.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

The challenges associated with providing community care for people with complex heeds in rural areas: a qualitative investigation

The aim of the present study was to explore the experiences of recipients and providers of community care in rural areas in Northern Ireland. Additionally, the authors sought to examine the impact of location, housing and environmental factors on the delivery of community care to older people with complex needs. Individual, semistructured interviews were held with service users (n = 17) and family carers (n = 14).

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

Responding to the needs of carers of people with schizophrenia

As more people with a serious mental illness such as schizophrenia live in the community, often with their own families, carers need increasing support. Reports on a small research study which found a link between carers' knowledge of the condition and their ability to manage problems, and between their sense of satisfaction with services and their communications with the mental health team.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Informal care in farming families in Northern Ireland: some considerations for social work

This paper is the result of a study of the dynamics of care-giving within farming families in Northern Ireland. It is argued that whilst much is known about informal care, existing knowledge is largely urban based and quantitative, and therefore limited. Following in-depth interviews with 'farm wives' it is concluded that for these women care-giving patterns are dependent on a particular set of cultural expectations and norms. Within farming families there is much resistance to becoming involved with formal social services.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Dependence, independence or inter-dependence? Revisiting the concepts of 'care' and 'dependency'

Research and theory on ‘dependency’ and ‘care-giving’ have to date proceeded along largely separate lines, with little sense that they are exploring and explaining different aspects of the same phenomenon. Research on ‘care’, initially linked to feminism during the early 1980s, has revealed and exposed to public gaze what was hitherto assumed to be a ‘natural’ female activity. Conversely, disability activists and writers who have promoted a social model of disability have seen the language of and the policy focus upon ‘care’ as oppressive and objectifying.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Being there

The Parkinson's Disease Society has produced a DVD, Being There, which aims to answer the questions and concerns of people newly diagnosed with the condition. Being There provides an insight into symptoms, treatments and life with Parkinson's in general, and includes interviews with people with Parkinson's, carers, and expert healthcare professionals The DVD is divided into four chapters: introduction to Parkinson's disease; treating Parkinson's; living with Parkinson's; and about the Parkinson's Disease Society.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16