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Community care

Role of the Admiral Nurse in supporting a person with dementia and their family carer

Distress is commonly experienced by those caring for someone with dementia, and can occur whether the carer is living with a person with dementia, or supporting a person with dementia who lives alone to maintain their independence. It is essential for health and social care professionals to support family carers to balance their needs with those of the person they care for. However, this might be challenging because many influencing factors can affect these needs, and identifying the needs of the family carer and balancing them with the needs of the person with dementia is often complex.

Mon, 03/25/2019 - 12:32

Training informal caregivers to care for older people after stroke: A quasi-experimental study

Aims: This study aimed at evaluating whether training on practical skills involved in providing care reduces the burden experienced by informal caregivers and improves their general health condition.; Background: A substantial number of informal caregivers lack skills to deliver poststroke assistance to older people after hospital discharge, which leads to burden situations as well as mental and physical health deterioration of the former.; Design: A quasi-experimental design.; Methods: This study involved 174 informal care

Wed, 01/23/2019 - 10:51

Benefit finding for Chinese family caregivers of community‐dwelling stroke survivors: A cross‐sectional study

Aims and objectives: To identify whether benefit finding is a mediator or moderator in the relationship between caregiver burden and psychological well‐being (anxiety and depression) in Chinese family caregivers of community‐dwelling stroke survivors. Background: Family caregivers not only bear a heavy burden, a high level of anxiety and depression, but also experience benefit finding (positive effects result from stressful events).

Wed, 10/31/2018 - 14:49

The experience of caring for older people with dementia in a rural area: using services

Reports on findings from the carer component of the Gwynedd Dementia Study. It is based on carer interviews, using quantitative and qualitative data. It describes the carers, their perceptions of their dependents' problems, the common challenges they face, their experiences of formal and informal support and, with reference to the literature, identifies implications for policy and practice. Levels of formal service inputs were low, but most of the carers appeared to receive the services they needed.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

Informal carers and the primary care team

The number of carers in the community is rising, and the importance of general practice in providing supportfor them has been highlighted. Caring for a disabled friend or relative has been shown to be harmful to the health of the caregiver and changes in social and family structure have led carers to become isolated and more reliant on the formal support services. However, many carersfeel that GPs do not understand their needs, and in turn many GPs and nursesfeel that they lack the relevant resources and training to take a more proactive role.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

Working with family carers of people with dementia: 'negotiated' coping as an essential outcome

Supporting family carers is likely to remain at the forefront of community care policy in dementia care for the foreseeable future. However, despite extensive research in the area there is little evidence for the effectiveness of current interventions. Using data from an Australian study of how carers of people with dementia cope with the challenges they face, this article calls for a re-appraisal of the ways in which a successful intervention is defined and promotes an approach based on partnership in which carers themselves play a significant role in determining 'what works'.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

Staying put: keeping the family home for adults with a learning disability

Valuing People reminds us that 60 percent of adults with learning disabilities are still living at home being supported by relatives. The author investigates how older carers could best use the family home in planning for the future and reviews the different arrangements families can put in place to ensure a son of daughter can continue to live at home.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

'Listen to what I'm saying': person centred care and the single assessment process

Person centred care means listening to people to find out what is most important to them and without making assumptions. Care is holistic, and centres on the whole person: who they are, their life before, and how they currently feel. The emphasis is on what the person can, rather than cannot do. This video shows health and social care professionals working directly with individuals and their carers. There are no actors, and no prepared scripts. The film shows what a difference a person centred approach makes to individuals with many/complex needs.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

Drawing the line: the boundaries of volunteering in the community care of older people

Volunteers can play important roles in the provision of support and care to frail or confused older people living in their own homes. There are conflicting expectations as to what these roles should be since there are unclear boundaries with those of paid care and with informal care. The present article explores some of these boundaries, drawing on material from a study of 14 volunteer schemes in England. The aim of the research was to explore the roles played by volunteers in the overall care division of labour.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:21

Training as a vehicle to empower carers in the community: more than a question of information sharing

Much confusion still surrounds the concept of empowerment and how it is to be translated into practice within the context of community care for service users and carers. A major limitation has been the tendency to treat empowerment as synonymous with participation in decision-making with little attention given to the ‘ecological’ model of empowerment where linkages have been found between community participation and measures of psychological empowerment.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:20