Skip to content

Toggle service links
Subscribe to RSS - England

You are here

  1. Home
  2. England

England

End-of-life care: A qualitative study comparing the views of people with dementia and family carers

Background: In recent years, UK policy has increasingly recognised the importance of end-of-life care in dementia. While professional consensus on optimal palliative care in dementia has been reported, little is known about the perspectives of people with dementia and family carers. Aim: To compare the views of people with dementia and family carers of people with dementia (current and recently bereaved) on optimal end-of-life care. Design: Qualitative interviews (32) and a focus group were conducted. Data were thematically analysed.

Mon, 11/19/2018 - 16:27

Scaffolding and working together: a qualitative exploration of strategies for everyday life with dementia

Background: living with dementia has been described as a process of continual change and adjustment, with people with dementia and their families adopting informal strategies to help manage everyday life. As dementia progresses, families increasingly rely on help from the wider community and formal support. Methods: this article reports on a secondary analysis of qualitative data from focus groups and individual interviews with people with dementia and their carers in the North of England.

Wed, 10/31/2018 - 14:39

The complex relationship between household income of family caregivers, access to palliative care services and place of death: A national household population survey

Background: Previous work shows that more affluent patients with cancer are more likely to die at home, whereas those dying from non-cancer conditions are more likely to die in hospital. Family caregivers are an important factor in determining place of death. Aim: To investigate associations between family caregivers' household income, patients' access to specialist palliative care and place of patients' death, by level of personal end-of-life care. Design: A cross-sectional community household population survey.

Mon, 10/22/2018 - 13:43

Carer involvement in compulsory out-patient psychiatric care in England

Background: There is an expectation in current heath care policy that family carers are involved in service delivery. This is also the case with compulsory outpatient mental health care, Community Treatment Orders (CTOs) that were introduced in England in 2008. No study has systematically investigated family involvement through the CTO process.; Method: We conducted qualitative interviews with 24 family carers to ascertain their views and experiences of involvement in CTOs.

Wed, 08/22/2018 - 14:17

Updated review of research on risk and adult social care in England

This paper updates an earlier extensive review of research into the incidence and management of risk in adult social care in England, and addresses gaps identified in the earlier review. This paper aimed to identify only empirical research published since 2007 and concentrated on research conducted and published within the UK.

The review:

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

'The Tender Trap': Gender, Part-Time Nursing and the Effects of 'Family-Friendly' Policies on Career Advancement

With the Government promoting flexible and ‘family-friendly’ policies within the NHS, an increase in the number of part-time nurses is imminent, particularly in view of current pro-active recruitment drives in this area. Research, however, indicates that it is mainly female employees who continue to utilise such policies with few male nurses employed on a part-time or flexible basis.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

Macmillan Carers Schemes in England: results of a multicentre evaluation

Maintaining sick and elderly people at home, particularly as they approach the end of life, is a long-established challenge for health and social care services. Over the past 30 years palliative care providers have attempted a variety of innovations in this area. We report on a descriptive study of seven pilot Macmillan Carers Schemes in England. The schemes sought to provide practical and emotional help to cancer patients and families living in their own homes. Data are available on 624 referrals to the schemes over a 1-year period.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:22

Mapping the future of family care: receipt of informal care by older people with disabilities in England to 2032

Many long-term care systems in economically developed countries are reliant on informal care. However, in the context of population ageing, there are concerns about the future supply of informal care. This article reports on projections of informal care receipt by older people with disabilities from spouses and (adult) children to 2032 in England. The projections show that the proportions of older people with disabilities who have a child will fall by 2032 and that the extent of informal care in future may be lower than previously estimated.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:22