Skip to content

Toggle service links

You are here

  1. Home
  2. families

families

Experiences of giving and receiving care in traumatic brain injury: An integrative review

Aims and objectives: To synthesise the literature on the experiences of giving or receiving care for traumatic brain injury for people with traumatic brain injury, their family members and nurses in hospital and rehabilitation settings. Background: Traumatic brain injury represents a major source of physical, social and economic burden. In the hospital setting, people with traumatic brain injury feel excluded from decision‐making processes and perceive impatient care. Families describe inadequate information and support for psychological distress.

Wed, 04/03/2019 - 09:48

Qualitative Analysis of Faith Community Nurse–Led Cognitive-Behavioral and Spiritual Counseling for Dementia Caregivers

This article presents themes emerging from semistructured interviews with dementia family caregivers in rural communities who participated in an integrative, cognitive-behavioral and spiritual counseling intervention, and with faith community nurses (FCNs) who delivered the intervention. The primary objectives of the counseling intervention were to ameliorate dementia caregivers’ depressive affect and the severity of their self-identified caregiving and self-care problems.

Mon, 04/01/2019 - 15:13

Tolerating Uncertainty: Perceptions of the Future for Ageing Parent Carers and Their Adult Children with Intellectual Disabilities

Background: Improved life expectancy means that more adults with intellectual disabilities are now living with ageing parents. This study explored older families' perceptions of the future. Methods: Semi‐structured interviews were conducted with nine older parents and three adults with intellectual disabilities and analysed to produce an explanatory thematic framework.

Thu, 03/28/2019 - 14:23

Sharing Care Responsibilities Between Professionals and Personal Networks in Mental Healthcare: A Plea for Inclusion

This positional paper explores the role of personal networks (family and friends) in caring for people with mental health problems. Since the eighties, major changes have been made in the organization and focus of professional mental healthcare. Correspondingly, new expectations and changes in the division of care responsibilities between people with mental health problems, their personal networks and their professional care providers were created.

Wed, 03/20/2019 - 15:15

Exposing the Backstage: Critical Reflections on a Longitudinal Qualitative Study of Residents' Care Networks in Assisted Living

In this article, we analyze the research experiences associated with a longitudinal qualitative study of residents’ care networks in assisted living. Using data from researcher meetings, field notes, and memos, we critically examine our design and decision making and accompanying methodological implications. We focus on one complete wave of data collection involving 28 residents and 114 care network members in four diverse settings followed for 2 years. We identify study features that make our research innovative, but that also represent significant challenges.

Wed, 03/20/2019 - 12:17

The last taboo: The experience of violence in first-episode psychosis caregiving relationships

Objectives: Informal caregiving relationships play an important role in facilitating recovery outcomes in psychosis. The relationship can serve as a source of positive experiences that co-exist alongside common challenges typically associated with mental health problems. People with psychosis, when compared to the general population, are more likely to perpetrate acts of violence, a relationship that is particularly evident during the first psychosis episode.

Wed, 02/06/2019 - 12:07

Burden and Strain among Familial Caregivers of Patients with Dementia in China

Background: Alzheimer's disease is one of a variety of progressive and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative diseases that are characterized by a number of nervous and mental symptoms and behavior disorders. These problems are likely to cause burden and strain on caregivers. In this study, we demonstrated the level and relationship of burden and strain among caregivers of dementia patients in China. Methods: A total of 212 caregivers of family members with dementia responded to the survey.

Fri, 11/23/2018 - 10:33

Unravelling positive aspects of caregiving in dementia: An integrative review of research literature

Background: Family caregiving is the crucial informal care resource to lessen the burdens associated with dementia. Research in this field has focused on reducing the caregiver's burden, but little attention has been given to promoting the positive aspects of caregiving. Objectives: To conduct a systematic critical review of research on the nature of positive aspects of caregiving, and the factors predicting this phenomenon among family caregivers of dementia patients, with the ultimate purpose of gaining insights to explain how and why it emerges.

Fri, 11/23/2018 - 10:20

Communication Coaching

BACKGROUND: Problematic communication among providers, patients, and their family members can affect the quality of patient care, causing stress to all parties involved and decreased opportunities for collaborative decision making. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this article is to present one case from a pilot study of a family caregiver intervention focused on communication. METHODS: The nurse-delivered communication intervention includes a written communication guide for family caregivers, as well as a one-time nurse communication coaching call.

Wed, 11/21/2018 - 16:58

Does vigilance in decision-making matter for dementia family caregivers?

Objectives: Family responsibilities and social expectations often prompt conflict in caregivers' decision-making processes. Janis and Mann's (1977) conflict model describes vigilance as high-quality decision-making resulting in optimal outcomes.

Wed, 11/21/2018 - 16:11

Page 3 of 27