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Profiles of Alzheimer's caregivers in Spain: social, educational and laboral characteristics

Background A person suffering from dementia needs increasing help from another person, who, in most cases, is a female family member. Times are changing and this traditional role can no longer be maintained. Aim The aim of this research was mainly centred on ascertaining the profile of caregivers and to find out how determinants such as age, sex and educational level and living conditions led people to assume that role.

Wed, 06/06/2018 - 15:30

Profiles of Alzheimer's caregivers in Spain: social, educational and laboral characteristics

Background A person suffering from dementia needs increasing help from another person, who, in most cases, is a female family member. Times are changing and this traditional role can no longer be maintained. Aim The aim of this research was mainly centred on ascertaining the profile of caregivers and to find out how determinants such as age, sex and educational level and living conditions led people to assume that role.

Wed, 06/06/2018 - 15:29

The Experience of Caring For or Living with an Individual with an Eating Disorder: A Meta-Synthesis of Qualitative Studies

Eating disorders (ED) has the highest mortality rate of psychiatric disorders and a high incidence of comorbidity. Because of the average age of onset, care typically befalls family members. However, despite the severity of the disorder and the burden placed on the family, research into the caregiving experience is still developing. Studies have shown caregivers of individuals with ED to experience high levels of distress, burden and expressed emotion.

Wed, 06/06/2018 - 12:01

Initial perceptions of palliative care: An exploratory qualitative study of patients with advanced cancer and their family caregivers

Background: Despite evidence for early integration of palliative care for people with advanced cancer and their families, patterns of late engagement continue. Prior research has focused on health professionals’ attitudes to palliative care with few studies exploring the views of patients and their carers. Aim: To explore initial perceptions of palliative care when this is first raised with patients with advanced cancer and their families in Australian settings.

Wed, 06/06/2018 - 11:32

Older people from white-British and Asian-Indian backgrounds and their expectations for support from their children

The importance of ties between older people and their children has been widely documented as a fundamental component in the provision and receipt of support. While the reference to such support is usually made in a benign manner, it is overly simplistic to assume that support provided by family members will always and necessarily lead to positive outcomes for older people. A person's perception of the adequacy or quality of support is inevitably influenced by his or her expectation of the type, frequency and source of support preferred or required.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

Costs and consequences for the carers of people with dementia in Ireland

This study examines the economic and psychological costs of care for family carers of people with dementia in Ireland. The analysis is based on an opportunistic survey of 98 carers of people with dementia. The article presents new findings on Irish carers' own perceptions of optimal care provision and the value of the care provided in monetary terms. Family carers in the survey provide an average of just under 12 hours of specified care each day to people with dementia.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

"I wanted to learn how to heal my heart": family carer experiences of receiving an emotional support service in the Well Ways programme

Family carers of people with mental illness provide an immense contribution to society in caring for mental health consumers. However, carers can experience substantial burdens and poor health outcomes themselves. Recognition of their needs for education and support has led to the development of a range of family education programmes.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

Training nurses to support carers of relatives with schizophrenia

Carers have an enormous amount of responsibility for the welfare and management of people with a mental illness in Britain, and many require help if they are to continue caring. Mental health nurses may be in a key position to offer support, but they are often unclear of what is required and how it should be delivered. Existing UK nurse-led psychosocial interventions for families often focus on the needs of the patient rather than the carer. This article describes a needs-led support service that has been designed for carers whose relatives are diagnosed with schizophrenia.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

Talking about care: two sides to the story

Despite its familiarity, the realities of care are both complex and contested. This book offers a unique approach to scrutinising the co-existence of both care and abuse in relationships. It demonstrates ways of increasing critical reflexivity when working with people involved in difficult care relationships. The book emphasises that when talking about care, we need to care about talk. Discourse analysis is introduced as a method of investigating relationships, policy and literature in informal care.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

Seeking respite: issues around the use of day respite care for the carers of people with dementia

Ageing in Place policies have transferred responsibility for many frail elderly people and those living with dementia from residential to in-home care. Despite this placing a greater obligation on families, in Australia carers continue to under-use day respite services. This qualitative design study identified issues around the use of day respite care from the perspective of the family carer, focusing on barriers to attendance and strategies to facilitate attendance.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

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