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Respite care as a community care service: factors associated with the effects on family carers of adults with intellectual disability in Taiwan

Background This study examines the effects and associated factors of respite care, which was legislated as a community service for adults with an intellectual disability (ID) in Taiwan in 1997.

Method A total of 116 family carers who live with an adult with ID and have utilised the respite care program were surveyed using standardised measures.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

Working with family carers of people with dementia: 'negotiated' coping as an essential outcome

Supporting family carers is likely to remain at the forefront of community care policy in dementia care for the foreseeable future. However, despite extensive research in the area there is little evidence for the effectiveness of current interventions. Using data from an Australian study of how carers of people with dementia cope with the challenges they face, this article calls for a re-appraisal of the ways in which a successful intervention is defined and promotes an approach based on partnership in which carers themselves play a significant role in determining 'what works'.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

Staying put: keeping the family home for adults with a learning disability

Valuing People reminds us that 60 percent of adults with learning disabilities are still living at home being supported by relatives. The author investigates how older carers could best use the family home in planning for the future and reviews the different arrangements families can put in place to ensure a son of daughter can continue to live at home.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

Telephone support group intervention for persons with hemophilia and HIV/AIDS and family caregivers

The purpose of this pilot project was to test the feasibility of a telephone support group intervention for persons with hemophilia and HIV/AIDS and for their family caregivers. Their support needs were unique because they did not identify with predominant groups of persons with AIDS and were geographically dispersed from peers. The 12 week intervention involved separate telephone support groups for hemophiliacs and for family caregivers. The two groups, comprised of a predetermined maximum of six people, were co-led by a professional and a peer.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:22

Listening to and learning from the family carer's story: an innovative approach in interprofessional education

Meeting family carers who recount their experiences of being on the receiving end of health and social care provides a 'real life' context in which undergraduate students from different professions can explore together and learn about interprofessional care and teamwork. This paper draws on data from a three-month in-depth evaluation of palliative care workshops in which medical, nursing, social work and rehabilitation therapy students interview family carers who are caring for someone with a terminal illness or who have recently been bereaved.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:22

Mapping the future of family care: receipt of informal care by older people with disabilities in England to 2032

Many long-term care systems in economically developed countries are reliant on informal care. However, in the context of population ageing, there are concerns about the future supply of informal care. This article reports on projections of informal care receipt by older people with disabilities from spouses and (adult) children to 2032 in England. The projections show that the proportions of older people with disabilities who have a child will fall by 2032 and that the extent of informal care in future may be lower than previously estimated.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:22

Including families and carers : an evaluation of the family liaison service on inpatient psychiatric wards in Somerset, UK

Purpose– National mental health policies in the UK have a common theme of seeking to develop working partnerships between people who use mental health services, their families and carers and professionals. In Somerset, following a staff training programme, a Family Liaison Service has been developed whereby systemically trained staff work alongside inpatient staff to hold family meetings as part of the assessment and admission process on all wards for working age adults and older people. This article aims to focus on this initiative.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:22

The support of parents in old age by those born during 1945-1954 : a European perspective

In 2004 in Europe, more than two-thirds of those born during 1945–54 had a parent or parent-in-law alive, and the rates of co-residence with their ascendants ranged from less than four per cent in Sweden, Denmark and The Netherlands, to between 17 and 24 per cent in Italy, Spain and Greece. The proportions that had provided practical help to their parents during the previous 12 months had a north-south gradient, from approximately one-in-three in the northern countries to 15 per cent or less in the southern countries.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:22

Occupational changes in caregivers for spouses with stroke and aphasia

Introduction: Stroke is a leading cause of disability worldwide. While health services focus on the needs of diagnosed persons, families provide extensive informal care with diverse effects on daily life and health. Understanding caregivers' experience is critical to support their health and sustained contributions. This exploratory study examined how caring for partners with stroke and aphasia impacts caregivers' activities, identifying possible differences according to race/ethnicity through the lens of occupation.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:22

Aging together: sibling carers of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities

Family care provision is the norm for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), even as they and their support networks grow older. As families age together, the role of primary carer frequently transitions from the parent to a sibling, as aging parents die or become too frail to provide continued support. The purpose of this paper is to explore the transition in care from the perspective of a sibling who has replaced parents as the primary carer for an individual aging with I/DD.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:21

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